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View Full Version : Fish mounting........Of course!


Albiemanmike
07-25-2003, 10:50 PM
Well anybody have any recommendations for who to contact about doing my fish??? I have gotten a quote of $14 an inch for a skin mount and $12 for a glass mount, no contest IMHO she gets the skin. For a measly $100 more you can have the real thing, but I want to be able to trust the person to not ruin my one and only 50 lber. so my ears are open. Please share any and all experiences as I have never had a fish done before and don't know anything about it. She is in a freezer at the tackle shop and there is no rush at this point, I did what the taxidermist told me on the phone so she should be good to go until I can get her to the shop I choose. Thanks.

Tightlines,
Mike Mayo

medic3
07-26-2003, 07:16 AM
if it was my fish, the only person i'd have touch it would be dan chisholm in plymouth mass...no offense to any other taxidermist out there, but this man is an artist, very gifted and experienced, trained by a great taxidermist who now works for the smithsonian in DC...personally i think dans work is better....508-224-4894...good luck

Albiemanmike
07-26-2003, 03:08 PM
Medic3,
Thanks for the advice that is what I wanted to hear. Somebody who was convinced that they knew someone that would be the only person for the job. I will contact him and see what he can tell me. Thanks again.

Tightlines,
Mike Mayo

Albiemanmike
07-26-2003, 04:25 PM
Medic3,
I contacted him and unfortunately he no longer does fish mounts, only doing mammals now and is backed up 2 years. Thanks for the info just the same.

Mike M.

bluewatr
07-26-2003, 05:10 PM
Mike,

I took one of my stripes to:

Northeast Taxidermy Studios
770 Newfield St
Middletown, CT 06457-1800 Phone: (860) 613-2067

He did the State and World stripe record.

He did a skin mount for me... Came out sweet!

I believe I paid $11/ inch four years ago......

Inspect the skin real well when you drop the fish off to whom ever you choose..... That way you can identify any new defects in the skin when you pick it up....

My fish got slightly damaged on the hike out from the hole! And it slightly shows on the mount.... But I expected as much....

The only thing I did not like about Northeast was that when I picked up the mount they provided no packaging.... They just handed me the fish...... If you use them bring some stuff to secure the fish so it does not get Effed up on the trek home!

I will say their showroom is awesome and worth the trip even if you plan not to use them (especially if you are a hunter, at which I am very avid).....

-mike

medic3
07-26-2003, 05:40 PM
sorry about that mike, its too bad, he does a great skin mount, i know he's backed up with deer, beer turkey etc....well good luck, don't settle for glass...

swnoel
07-28-2003, 05:23 PM
I've been doing taxidermy for 13 years now and would like to make a suggestion to you in regards to your striper.

It should be just fine to do a skin mount but DO NOT let the taxidermist use the real head.

It will ultimately grease out and the entire mount will become saturated... the only head to use would be a cast head.

Good luck, but please heed my suggestion.

Albiemanmike
07-28-2003, 05:27 PM
SWnoel,
Can you email me with your contact info I have some questions offline for you. striper@optonline.net

Thanks,
Mike Mayo

ppatricelli
07-28-2003, 10:39 PM
I am really surprised that no one has chimed in to the effect that a fiberglas mount is far superior to a skin mount. I know that there is that psychological edge to thinking "that's the real bass in there", but in reality, whatever organic material you put into it, it is the weak point aging wise, no matter what they do to it. Inevitally organic material breaks down. The only advantage to using the skin would be if the stripe pattern were perfectly perserved, but it fades so badly during the preservation process that it must be painted all over again anyway. In Alaska and the northwest, fiberglas mounts ARE THE WAY TO GO if you want the mount to last indefinitely, and I have seen salmon mounts where the paint job was every bit as good as the real thing.
Inevitably, it comes down to the expertise and art of the individual craftsman, and I can't help you at all. None of the AK or Northwest taxidermists will have ever seen a striper, so they would be clueless as well. But I urge you to get the opinion of a taxidermist whose work you have inspected and approved, on stripers, on HIS recommendation about fiberglass versus skin, assuming he/she has the capability either way. If they can only do skin, then you are not going to get an honest opinion.

ssully
07-28-2003, 11:15 PM
Mike,

Check your email.

swnoel
07-29-2003, 06:14 AM
I do agree that reproductions are the way to go on almost every large trout , salmon , and saltwater species.

Quality of reproductions have improved in recent years, but there are many out there that have little if not any detail to the scale patterns,thickness of tail and fins, etc.

Skin mounts with reproduction heads on the smaller fish work quite well and can last for years.

The only problem is that some species are very limited to the sizes available and it can be very costly making custom molds.

But... they can be done.

David Churbuck
07-29-2003, 09:08 AM
What about Wally Brown in Falmouth? I know he does glass -- most of the big mounts on the walls of Cape area tackle shops are Wally's work -- there's a monster at Red Top for example.

Everything I've read says glass is the way to go and that eventually, skin mounts all deteriorate due to inherent oils. I've seen some nasty, 30-50 year old mounts where the fish looks like something out of an egyptian tomb -- dried up, shrunken, and brown.

bigblue
07-29-2003, 09:14 AM
Originally posted by bluewatr
Mike,

I took one of my stripes to:

Northeast Taxidermy Studios
770 Newfield St
Middletown, CT 06457-1800 Phone: (860) 613-2067

He did the State and World stripe record.


-mike
Is he the guy that Al McReynolds talked about?