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timw
02-02-2006, 12:13 AM
If you are interested in the history of our saltwater fisheries you should find some good winter reading here http://www.penbay.org/usfc/usfc_subj.html#COD1

Onshore
02-02-2006, 07:07 AM
If you are interested in the history of our saltwater fisheries you should find some good winter reading here http://www.penbay.org/usfc/usfc_subj.html#COD1

Growing up in a Gloucester fisherman's family, I was exposed to a lot of that information and the two museums in Gloucester are full of such articles. But I'd never seen it on line. Thanks for posting the link.

clambelly
02-02-2006, 07:13 AM
thats great stuff.
ill have to read it later as i have to go to work now.
thanks for digging that up.

timw
02-03-2006, 08:22 AM
Below is a good one about the Penobscot, that my brother dug up. The last paragraph about the kids and the sturgeons is funny.

From:

"The Centennial Celebration of the Settlement of Bangor, September 30, 1869." 1870. Published by Direction of the Committee of Arrangements. Benjamin A. Burr, Printer. Bangor, Maine.

p. 79-81. Statement of Capt. Jacob Holyoke of Brewer. Born March 27, 1785 in Brewer. Died in Brewer, May, 2, 1865.

"I was born March 27, 1785, in the town of Brewer, my parents were living at that time in a log house near the small school house, just above John Holyoke's brick house, where the old cellar hole may now be seen ....

"Mr. John Emory lived at Robinson's cove, about one down river; Henry Kenney and John Tibbetts the only other settlers between our house and Col. Brewer's. There were no settlers back and no roads leading back from the river ....

"For many years the Indians were in the habit of making a camping ground of the flat between our house and the meeting house, near the present ship yard, every summer, in going to and returning from the seaboard, where they principally went after porpoises and seals. I have seen often thirty or forty wig-wams, built principally of birch bark, inhabited by two or three hundred Indians.

"There was a beautiful spring of water on the bank of the river, now covered up by John Holyoke's wharf, which the Indians used, and was also used by us.

"This flat of one or two acres was cleared, when my father first came to Brewer, and from the number of Indian stone implements found there in improving the land, was doubtless a very ancient Indian camping ground. When my father built his framed house he cleared up about six acres around it, and upon every side except the river it was a thick, heavy forest.

"Salmon, shad and alewives were very plenty, and in their season many people came here to catch them -- bass were also plenty, and in the fishing season, we could fill a batteau with fish at Treat's falls in a short time; we would sometimes take forty salmon in a day, and I think as many as five hundred were taken some days, in all. My father had a large seine in the eddy, just above the Bangor bridge, and we had much trouble with the sturgeon. When a large sturgeon was captured, the boys used to tie the painter of the boat to his tail and giving him eight or ten feet length of rope, let him go, and when he grew tired or lazy would poke him up with long sticks and so be carried all around the harbor

"(Signed) Jacob Holyoke. Brewer, Dec. 1860."