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View Full Version : Infected Striper in Waquoit


Albiesickness
05-31-2006, 06:56 PM
I never thought I would say this...but I'll give up striper fishing if I start to catch a lot of infected fish.

Just caught my first one...the whole thing was covered with what looked like cottage cheese...it was so nasty I stopped fishing.

I'll go back later.

It was a schoolie...boy would I like to know weather throwing it back did more harm than good.

Any ideas??????????????????????

NHAngler
05-31-2006, 08:10 PM
A while back there were some posts on this. Makes you want to wear a glove when landing / lipping fish. If for nothing else to avoid the burger thumb after a high numbers day.


http://www.reel-time.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49520 0

http://reel-time.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49195

Brian

BobG
05-31-2006, 08:28 PM
I told 'ya! :eek:
I got a couple like that already this season. The last one was on Morris Island. It was just an icky......mess. I sort of felt bad releasing the fish. Everyone said it was a 'hold-over' that acquired a fresh water type fungus, sort of like herring do when they're in the pond too long.
I'm not sure about that theory? :confused:

eastcoast617
05-31-2006, 08:51 PM
caught a twink on the front side of Cranes, that looked like a bird crapped on his eye. This fish had white a white patch above its eye that didn't look healthy.

sandy
05-31-2006, 09:43 PM
A while back there were some posts on this. Makes you want to wear a glove when landing / lipping fish. If for nothing else to avoid the burger thumb after a high numbers day.


http://www.reel-time.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49520 0

http://reel-time.com/forum/showthread.php?t=49195

Brian

I'm pretty sure the crusty white crap described in the first link and seen recently by several RTers is not the mycobacteria illness described in the second link. Others have pointed out this distinction before as well. Mycobacteriosis is characterized by open wounds on the fish, not the crusty white stuff.

Albiesickness
05-31-2006, 09:48 PM
This poor fish was covered at least 85% and it was just nasty...thick, cottage cheese all over it.

I hope this isn't a sign of things to come!!!!

Believe me...it will change your fishing experience...especially if it happens more often

albacized
06-01-2006, 05:23 AM
The white fungus look is not related to the infectious diseases (I forget the name of that disease) being found in Chesapeake Bay striped bass. I've been occasionally catching fish with ich (which is the name of the condition) since I moved up here in the 80's. It's mostly been striped bass...but I once caught a cod fish off Castle Island with that same condition. If you fish areas that are generally known for hosting holdovers, such as the Thames River in CT or Scorton's Creek, you'll catch a higher volume of fish with this condition. It's nothing new....

MKDeceiver
06-01-2006, 06:21 AM
I run 2 saltwaterfish tanks at my house. Dealing with fish disease is common, especially for the home aquarist. Most of the time disease pops up from stress ect. When I first started the tanks it was common for me to deal with disease. For example, white blotches would pop up on my fish or they would get parasites. Now that I feed them a balanced meal and maintain stable water conditions I don't have the same problems. More interesting though, I have fish that have healed themselves from some pretty gross stuff.

Moral of the story. Fish disease is common. Those fish your catching could be fish that are under stress. Perhaps they were recently caught, I don't know. The ocean is pretty stable chemistry wise so I doubt it's that. I wouldn't worry about it...Those fish you realeased will probably die because the stress level will be too much to overcome the infection. But if you think every fish you catch that is clean today, didn't have an infection of some sort at some point, your being overly optimistic.

White little growths usually mean lymphosistis or fungus as we know it. Just holding that fish out of the water for a short time can do wonders for a fish fighting a parasite infection or even fungus. Even scraping it off if you feel like being gross.:eek:Fungus can be contagious though, so if you catch one in a school in it, expect to see a few more with it. Give the fish a month of eating our shrimp, crabs and sand eels and I'm sure they will be good as new... :)

albacized
06-01-2006, 06:35 AM
I run 2 saltwaterfish tanks at my house. Dealing with fish disease is common, especially for the home aquarist. Most of the time disease pops up from stress ect. When I first started the tanks it was common for me to deal with disease. For example, white blotches would pop up on my fish or they would get parasites. Now that I feed them a balanced meal and maintain stable water conditions I don't have the same problems. More interesting though, I have fish that have healed themselves from some pretty gross stuff.

Moral of the story. Fish disease is common. Those fish your catching could be fish that are under stress. Perhaps they were recently caught, I don't know. The ocean is pretty stable chemistry wise so I doubt it's that. I wouldn't worry about it...Those fish you realeased will probably die because the stress level will be too much to overcome the infection. But if you think every fish you catch that is clean today, didn't have an infection of some sort at some point, your being overly optimistic.

White little growths usually mean lymphosistis or fungus as we know it. Just holding that fish out of the water for a short time can do wonders for a fish fighting a parasite infection or even fungus. Even scraping it off if you feel like being gross.:eek:Fungus can be contagious though, so if you catch one in a school in it, expect to see a few more with it. Give the fish a month of eating our shrimp, crabs and sand eels and I'm sure they will be good as new... :)

Exactly...and the reason many holdovers seem to get this is because the water temps adds to the stress the fish have to endure. There are other conditions that cause this. But it's my believe that enduring extreme temperature changes that is the leading cause here in New England.

Fly Deacon
06-01-2006, 08:05 AM
I also caught one by Cranes last Sunday - 90% covered - the stuff would fall off as the fish shook as I unhooked it.

DAQ
06-01-2006, 09:23 AM
The good thing is that these fish are still feeding so there is still some hope for them. I worked in a pet store and when a fish developed a fungus or had some other parasite we would treat the water and not worry. But, if the fish stopped feeding then it was soon to be headed for fish heaven via the porcelain jacuzzi.

D

Albiesickness
06-01-2006, 09:29 AM
The good thing is that these fish are still feeding so there is still some hope for them.

D

Everything about the fight was normal...but just shocking to catch and take off the hook.