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SpexnReds
11-03-2006, 12:31 PM
I am having trouble justifying the new prices of fly rods since the price of carbon went up-it just seems to me that $675 is a little outlandish. Has anyone tried those Temple Fork Rods? Please share your opinions on them, I have yet to cast one.

dims
11-03-2006, 04:53 PM
I am having trouble justifying the new prices of fly rods since the price of carbon went up-it just seems to me that $675 is a little outlandish. Has anyone tried those Temple Fork Rods? Please share your opinions on them, I have yet to cast one.

I have a 6 & 9wt. 6WT. 4PCS for salmon trolls nice for landlocks and 9wt. 2 pcs saw a lot of action striper fishing. My favorite out of the 3 salt fly rods I own. Nice action for me. I'd buy another one and highly recommend them. Great rod for the price and nicley built.

Hope that helps,dims

mcurtiss
11-03-2006, 05:01 PM
i have a 4 pc, 9 wt TFO Professional and I really like it. great value.

hardtail
11-03-2006, 06:53 PM
Sorbus in Mashpee, Ma has temple fork rods on sale for twenty five percent off 25%. Give them a call and see what they have. 508 539-0007

SageBoy
11-03-2006, 07:49 PM
I have an 8 and 12 TiCrX and they are very nice rods for the money. It's a fast rod so test before you buy. I would highly recommend them as well.

rockfisherman
11-03-2006, 08:10 PM
I have an 8 and 12 TiCrX and they are very nice rods for the money. It's a fast rod so test before you buy. I would highly recommend them as well.
What SageBoy said...very fast rods...they cast like a rocket. I have a 4 piece 9x9...I think it is a great rod for the money.

RogerStg
11-03-2006, 11:13 PM
I've got about a dozen of them from 2 wt to 14 wt. They seem to have something for everyone and they have a number of innovative rod designs.

Capt. John
11-04-2006, 07:10 AM
Don't own any but have cast a few, nice rods for the price. Also take a look at Albrights stuff. Very similar price range and very nice rods for the $$. I have been fishing them for 3 years now up to the 12 wts. I have a few 12 wts that we have abused on tuna up to 60lbs and have yet to break one. I just ordered some of XX (lou Tabory design) series. My advice is you MUST cast a rod before you buy. Rods have different actions and a rod that may be awesome for one guy, is not right for the next- we all have different casting styles. Also- a certain line will cast best on a rod. It's a little work to find the perfect combo but a GOOD fly shop will let you try out different different stuff before you buy. Just me 2 cents....

mcurtiss
11-04-2006, 09:38 AM
have people found that the TiCR rods, being so fast, cast better with a a line one weight up from their rating?

RogerStg
11-04-2006, 10:25 AM
have people found that the TiCR rods, being so fast, cast better with a a line one weight up from their rating?

No. You may be thinking about the TiCrX, which is fast, but not as fast as the TiCr. My understanding is that the rod was designed and evaluated using SA GPX lines. Those lines are advertised to be 1/2 wt heavier than AFTMA specs, and the lines I've weight were closer to 1 full weight heavier.

Sooo, many folks find the TiCrX to cast best by uplining 1 weight, especially if it's a short headed fly line and/or throwing medium to large flies.

Henry
11-04-2006, 04:45 PM
TFO rods are great value no doubdt!. I've got a TiCr 7 & 10wt and they are superb!. The action is very fast...and supports "overlining" quite well by one if not 2 weights. They suite me perfectly for my lazy/compact casting style especially when wading flats or beaches.

I don't think you'd be dissappointed if you picked one up in your preferred weight. Not everything comes with a heafty price tag.

Best regards,

Henry Will

bonefishdick
11-04-2006, 11:02 PM
Spex

I have a few of their rods and I think they are great, My main rod is the two piece 9ft 9wt, I like it so much I had to have two, I have been known to break a rod now and then , so when I do, I have a back up with me at all times, The service from Templefork is great, I have always got my rods back within 7 to 8 days. Can't beat that. That alone is a good reason to get one.

I have the 4 piece professional in 9wt for travel which I used in Belize on Permit and I also have the Ticr-X in 8wt that is awsome with a 9wt line that I used for the Bonefish. This year I bought the Ticr in 10wt for use in the Boat and for the Albies. Hope to christen it next week when I go to Harkers Island.

Good Luck on what ever you decide.

SpexnReds
11-04-2006, 11:16 PM
Well, I'm convinced. To tell u the truth, I'm one of those guys who doesnt care too much for the speed of a rod, I haven't had any trouble adapting my stroke to a full flex rod or one that is so stiff it's like casting w/a broomstick. In otherwards, I can adapt to changes. The main problem I have with rods is durability. A lifetime warranty doesnt mean anything when that $3000+ you spent on a trip is tragically interrupted by rod breaks. That is where my problems with Orvis rods start.

striperblues
11-05-2006, 07:18 AM
Don't own any but have cast a few, nice rods for the price. Also take a look at Albrights stuff. Very similar price range and very nice rods for the $$. I have been fishing them for 3 years now up to the 12 wts. I have a few 12 wts that we have abused on tuna up to 60lbs and have yet to break one. I just ordered some of XX (lou Tabory design) series. My advice is you MUST cast a rod before you buy. Rods have different actions and a rod that may be awesome for one guy, is not right for the next- we all have different casting styles. Also- a certain line will cast best on a rod. It's a little work to find the perfect combo but a GOOD fly shop will let you try out different different stuff before you buy. Just me 2 cents....

This fish was caught on the new Albright Lou Tabory XX rod using the new SA Coldwater Intermediate line. It was put to the test on a number of good size bass that needed to be horsed out of rocks. A also own a 10Wt. EXS.

My TFO TiCR 8 Wt. has been superb. I also cast a 10Wt. St. Croix Legend Elite that has proven itself over and over.

I will never again buy an expensive rod.

NMB
11-05-2006, 08:00 AM
read the comments carefully. tfo's are good rods "for the money". if you are an accomplished caster, you are likely to be quite dissapointed. they are a low/medium priced rod that is hiped to the gills and performs comparable to its price range. frankly, i'd suggest looking at the sage mid or lower priced rods. also there are many other small rod companies without the hype that are even less expensive and far superior in my view than a tfo. take a look at a heritage rod out of springfield ma. they're specialists in salmon/steelhead rods where the selection is dizzying. but there salt water rods and trout rods are impressive as well.they have a lifetime warranty. like tfo, the're made overseas, and they've been around a while.

Jim Royston
11-05-2006, 09:27 AM
If you're dropping $3000 on the trip, why don't you look for one of the Sage XP 4 piece sticks on closeout. Full factory warranty and terrific rods for about $400.

seatrout
11-05-2006, 10:49 AM
I find the TFO's to my liking and have 9 of them ranging from three to ten weight. I overline all except the new Jim Teeney series by one line weight with full weight forwards, and overline all of them by the same amount ( 1 line weight) with shooting heads. I think they are a great value and sold my two Sage rods on Ebay. The different rod series are not the same, and I really do recommend casting them rather than trying to make a decision based on a discription. You may find you like some weights in the TICR, some in the TICRX, and some in the Teeney. That's how it worked out for me.

mdrew9
11-05-2006, 10:53 AM
My first rod was a TFO 9 wt, I then built a much faster rod a few winters ago and can't go back to the TFO.

englishman
11-05-2006, 02:30 PM
Try before you buy is great advice, but what if you don’t have access to a store and expert help? And are reliant on mail order to get all your supplies.
How would you determine your casting style and what action rod to buy, Fast, med fast etc How easy would it be to adapt to a “fast action rod “.

RogerStg
11-05-2006, 05:46 PM
read the comments carefully. tfo's are good rods "for the money". if you are an accomplished caster, you are likely to be quite dissapointed.

TFOs are good rods - period. The fact that they are a good value is simply a bonus. FWIW, I am an "accomplished caster" whatever that means, and am forunate enough to be in a position to be able to afford any rod, yet I pick TFO for performance.

You mentioned that they are hyped. You couldn't be more wrong. Look at any fly fishing publication and there are pages and pages of advertising "hype" from all the major rod companies. Yet there are NO ads by TFO. Their success is based on word of mouth, not slick ads.

BTW, you can figure that about 20% of the price you pay for your professionally hyped rods is the cost of those ads.

SpexnReds
11-05-2006, 07:19 PM
In my opinion, the most hyped rods I have put my hands on are Sage. It is probably just my opinion (seeing as how popular they are), but they seem to lack the power they should have for their price. I also don't find them as balanced as Scott rods, which I love, but prices are going up. Luckily, they are coming out with a new saltwater rod, the X2s, which I can't wait to try out. Plus, it's $100 cheaper than the s3s. I found out one thing troublesome about TFO rods. Apparently, the company isn't doing that well, and I can't count on them being around 5 years from now. In otherwards, I would end up spending more on buying another TFO rod if the company goes belly up and I have a rod break. This is of course hypothetical, but I'm starting to lean towards companies with staying power.

johnmauser
11-05-2006, 07:45 PM
I'm very surprised to hear that tfo is having problems, with their rods being as popular as they are. I have a 10wt and an 8wt and love them. The other positive is that tfo is forcing other companies to rethink the pricing range of their rods.

In my opinion, the most hyped rods I have put my hands on are Sage. It is probably just my opinion (seeing as how popular they are), but they seem to lack the power they should have for their price. I also don't find them as balanced as Scott rods, which I love, but prices are going up. Luckily, they are coming out with a new saltwater rod, the X2s, which I can't wait to try out. Plus, it's $100 cheaper than the s3s. I found out one thing troublesome about TFO rods. Apparently, the company isn't doing that well, and I can't count on them being around 5 years from now. In otherwards, I would end up spending more on buying another TFO rod if the company goes belly up and I have a rod break. This is of course hypothetical, but I'm starting to lean towards companies with staying power.

SpexnReds
11-05-2006, 08:52 PM
I should have been more clear, my apologies. It is not definite about the well being of TFO rods, but one of my friends knows one of the people who is very involved in the company at a high level. From what he has told me, the company is not doing as great as it should. What does this mean? Who knows, but the words that are stuck in my mind came from him-"The way that company is going, I don't know how they are going to stay in business a couple years from now"

RogerStg
11-06-2006, 08:49 AM
one of my friends knows one of the people who is very involved in the company at a high level. From what he has told me, the company is not doing as great as it should.

Unless your friend’s acquaintance is the owner, I would not put any stock in his opinion about the viability of the company. Heck, in my line of work, often, even the owners don’t know how their company is doing until I tell them.

For example: the reality of any company experiencing a rapid growth in sales like TFO has, is that available cash will be in short supply. It’s in short supply because a company basically has to pay for inventory and related labor and overhead before they themselves get paid for the same inventory. If orders keep increasing, the company has to front more and more cash to fund the inventory and accounts receivable.

Normally profits can cover this, but if the net profit is 15% and the sales growth is 25%, cash will be in short supply.

This cash shortage during periods of accelerated growth causes prudent managers try to keep borrowing and non-essential spending to a minimum. Company personnel see a busy workforce, lots of sales, yet miserly spending. Hence the false conclusion that they draw is that “the company is not doing as great as it should". I see this often. The reality of course is quite the opposite.

I don’t know that this is the TFO scenario, but if there is any basis in reality to the normally dubious “friend of a friend” scuttlebutt, I would bet it would be - it's very common.

I think TFO has been around for about 10 years now, so they are no Johnny come lately. Units sold through fly shops that I’m involved with continue to increase the number of units sold. I doubt that they are in any trouble because their prices have not increased very much, they seem to be meeting orders and they still do not need to advertise in order to survive. Based on those factors, I’d conclude that they must be doing well.

JGH
11-06-2006, 09:04 AM
read the comments carefully. tfo's are good rods "for the money". if you are an accomplished caster, you are likely to be quite dissapointed. they are a low/medium priced rod that is hiped to the gills and performs comparable to its price range. frankly, i'd suggest looking at the sage mid or lower priced rods. also there are many other small rod companies without the hype that are even less expensive and far superior in my view than a tfo. take a look at a heritage rod out of springfield ma. they're specialists in salmon/steelhead rods where the selection is dizzying. but there salt water rods and trout rods are impressive as well.they have a lifetime warranty. like tfo, the're made overseas, and they've been around a while.

I don't know about that "for the money" stuff. I have a TFO TICr 8 wt, and I'd put it up against any rod I've cast in that line weight...and I own Sage XPs, RPLXis, and Xi2s, and have fished (but don't own) many others. The TFO does not have the highly polished finish of some other rods, and the reel seats look and feel cheaper to me, but as far as casting, I'm not sure there's a real drop-off from the most expensive rods. It may also differ by rod weight....I just know that my 8 wt TFO is sweet. If you like fast-action rods, the TFO TiCr is worth a test-drive.

bonefishdick
11-21-2006, 05:02 PM
Spex

A number of people have recommended the TFO, and that is for good reason. The Sage Rods are great, so are the prices, If you are not killed on a fast rod then try the TFO professional it seems to have a softer feel. My suggestion is to try some at one of the Fly Fishing shows this winter unless of course this is something that is going to be on the list from Santa.

Jim B. Hawes
12-07-2006, 05:54 PM
I own a 4 & 6 wt TFO PRO for freshwater fishing and without a doubt they are a great value rod.

Most observable difference compared to the higher end rods is their hardware, which is definitely lower end appearance, but quite durable.

I normally fish a T&T or Sage, and use the TFO's as back-up or for companions. I'd say the drop off for casting is about 5-10% between the TFO and SAGE or T&T; not much given the humongous price difference. The average caster would not be able to notice such slight difference, which I found to be most noticeable in terms of fine control and long distance casting. Close enough that it wouldn't bother me in the slightest to fish the TFO all day long.

I'm buying 2 TFO rods as back up to my 8 and 10 wt rods for a Bahamas trip this Spring; due to my experience last Spring with the PRO series rods, they will be either a TICr or TICrX. As you go up in the size of your quarry, you'll likely want to move away from the PRO or lower series and look at the TICr or TICrX as better casting rods in the wind and more suited to fighting larger fish. The Pro series makes you feel out gunned on big fish and you'll be fighting them from the rod butt.

seatrout
12-07-2006, 09:23 PM
Like Roger said, that company is in no trouble. The lower priced rods showing up elsewhere are likely a result of their success, and if you are inclined to look at spinning tackle try their 4 piece spin rods. I fished them in Newport, and am already selling some of my old tried and true plugging tackle so I can get theirs ... lighter outperformers with better reach. They are growing and have lots of different types of tackle now.
Like I said the other day, I bought their fly rods first as back up tackle, then my perfectly good rods took a back seat to the TFO's, then I sold the others.

FishHawk
12-08-2006, 06:59 AM
Ok so , I'm going to build a TFO TICr 8wt rod. What I really want is a 8wt rod for bonefishing so should I get the 7wt TFO TICr since these rods cast well with one line weight up ? I think that the biggest problem we all have is matching the line to the rod depending on our casting style . I'm tired of making the wrong decision as I'm sure all of you have been in this boat. Most flyshops don't have lines and rods set up before you buy. Universal problem.
Thanks for your imput. FishHawk

Jim Royston
12-08-2006, 08:46 AM
I don't know of a flyshop that won't let you test cast a rod, even if it's in the parking lot. What's the value added of buying from a shop as opposed to an internet dealer if you can't try before you buy?

confluential
12-08-2006, 09:11 AM
I'd have to vote for going 8wt and if you feel the need, uplining it to a 9wt line (never hurts to have an extra 8wt line in your tackle closet). If there's a chance you have a shot at a school of jacks while you're holding that rod ... you don't want that seven.

I broke an 8wt bonefishing in FL (actually with a clouser, not a fish) but was stuck down there with no spare. I bought the 4pc 9x9 TFO TiCrX because it was a good deal. It's a total boomstick and I can throw line like a god with it. Furthermore, the rod "fights" better than any other one I own. You can really put the screws to a nasty fish with confidence with a TFO.

RogerStg
12-08-2006, 05:40 PM
Ok so , I'm going to build a TFO TICr 8wt rod. What I really want is a 8wt rod for bonefishing so should I get the 7wt TFO TICr since these rods cast well with one line weight up ?

You're probably thinking of the TiCrX, which was designed around the GPX line that is 1/2 wt heavier than listed and has a very long head. The TiCr will fish well with the labeled line.

LeeG
01-02-2007, 04:17 PM
I've got 2 sage rods (sp+ and ds) and 3 tfo rods. Last year I casted the ticr and the ticrx side by side and, not withstanding the sales guy's opinion about how great the new ticrx was/is, I preferred the ticr. It's a matter of preference. I liked the slightly slower rod better. Not being satisfied with what my own lying eyes were telling me, I asked Lefty Kreh about it. His answer, in short, was they're both good rods and go with what you like. Being faster doesn't equate to better.

Try the professional, ticr (if they still have them) and ticrx and buy what you like. All three will treat you well.

NMB
01-02-2007, 08:52 PM
yellowstoneangler.com did a very scientific and detailed analytical comparison between a number of premiun rods-scott, loomis orvis, winston, sage and and others and the tfo's. the tfo's brought up the rear big time. check out the test -tfo's weren't even close. the test is on line.

Eddy Merckx
01-02-2007, 10:49 PM
yellowstoneangler.com did a very scientific and detailed analytical comparison between a number of premiun rods-scott, loomis orvis, winston, sage and and others and the tfo's. the tfo's brought up the rear big time. check out the test -tfo's weren't even close. the test is on line.

Test categories like "X-Factor" and "Fun to Fish" at yellowstoneangler.com don't sound 'very scientific' to me. (Besides, they're testing 5-weight trout rods, I don't see how the test is relevant to 9-weight saltwater rods.)

The TFOs took a beating in the test because they don't come with a rod case, don't have premium cork, and don't cast particularly well at close distances. Don't think any of those criticisms surprise anyone here. Value is the name of the game with TFOs, not craftsmanship.

But hey, if you have a spare $630, the author of the test (George Anderson, the owner of Yellowstone Angler) will gladly sell you a Loomis GLX, the top-rated rod in his test. Or if you want to part with $1100, I'm sure he can hook you up with a Tom Morgan rod, also very highly rated in the test. (Did I mention that George "helped Tom Morgan with final prototype designs of the Tom Morgan Rodsmiths rods, and then did all the final casting and fine-tuning of the pre-production prototypes as well as approval of the finished rods." Hmmm, ya don't suppose that tidbit had any bearing on the outcome of the 'test'?)

masssalt
01-03-2007, 05:38 AM
Oh, puleez!

Am I the only one who noticed that the, " Winning," rods are not only the brands that the guy sells, but they are rods that he claims to have had design input into?

That is the most overtly slanted product comparison I have ever seen, and was IMO in no way scientific.

NMB
01-03-2007, 06:31 AM
take a close look at the test. in addition to the craftmanship tfo was behind in the casting categories as well.and casting categories were twice as important in the test. yellowstone carries orvis and tfos, neither of which faired well in the test. their top selling rod is the winston boronIIx which did not fare too well either. so i do not think that the test was biased nor was the test based on cosmetics. my biggest criticism with the test is that it was done in a gymnasium in ideal conditions. all of that said, i have never been impressed with tfo's other than their hype. imho, there are much better rods for the same amount of money,(st croix, sage, etc) and despite tfo'sr hype and who endorses them, they are a middle of the road rod.

Slamdance
01-03-2007, 06:47 AM
Fishing for bonefish with an 8 or 9-weight is like wrapping your junk in 12 condoms before heading out on the town. Sure, it may be safe, but it's not much fun. I've found a 6-weight is about the perfect bonefishing rod.

Mark Dougherty
01-07-2007, 08:55 AM
Having worked in a shop that sold "Top of the Line" rods and TFO's, one should consider that the profit margin in the flyshop biz is about 40%....do the math....I could predicted the outcome of the test results without ever picking up the rods.....I have casted every TFO made.....they are great rods with great company service should a problem occur.

randrade
01-07-2007, 05:42 PM
Can someone explain to me why there is such an extraordinary price difference between rod brands? is it the price of the carbon cloth and glue? (I do not see it), is it the quality of the taper design (if so, why are there no rod design superstars)? or something else?

I mean, every outlandishly priced rod is sold on the grounds of its "superior" performance, but where is that "performance difference" coming from (if it really exists)? I mean, if the cost of the carbon cloth is a small fraction of the rod cost (which it is, no matter what type) and there is no proprietary restrictions on taper design (which there aren't), then why would there be a such a huge difference in the price of the rods?

In the old days we bought hand planned bamboo rods and yes, there was a difference, but those rods were artisanal not industrial products. So historically there is some antecedent that validates the idea that there might be great rods, but is that notion sustainable nowadays? I do not think so.

Let me give you an old guy's take on this.

I am old enough to remember when graphite (and boron) rods first appeared in the market, and of course they were expensive (like digital watches, which also were initially very expensive). However shortly, and to our amazement, we watched the rod market collapse as rods started getting less and less expensive (again like digital watches). We used to sit on the banks of our home river and wonder in amazament at this fantastic rods we could get for almost no money ($15, if I recall correctly, for a korean jobbie back in the early 1980s). And we wondered if there was a bottom....rods were becoming what economists call commodities, and there is nothing worse for an industry that the commodization of its output.

But of course back then we used to tie our flies on Thompson model As, and thought the Pflueger medalist was quite serviceable from small trout all the way up to Tarpon (with a little tampering...and they were) and the flyfishing industry was essentially pure mom and pop. So there was no industry to suffer.

Sometime in the early 1980s however, someone realized that you could sell what was really cheap to produce industrially for a lot of money, provided you differentiated it, and this simple realization created the flyfishing industry as we know it. My recollection is that the first "modern" FF item to follow this marketing path was the API fly tying vice (they should get a "pioneer" award from the industry). Of course we thought it was crazy, but it sold like hotcakes and within a decade everybody had figured out the trick and the industry had been born.

(yes, SAGE should be in the list of acquisitions for LVMH, it would fit right in...ok, will soon when their rods get pricey enough,.... they are almost there).

And of course the system is self perpetuating. The newbies want to fish and become competent flyfishers, and they get their Instructions (sorry, "news and information") from the FF industry mags and TV shows etc (not to mention self-serving posts in web forums --123-3) . Anyway, a clean path to become a flyfisher has been laid in from of the unsuspecting, with all sorts of help and heroes and opportunities, and all you have to do to join is hand over your wallet. And of course everyone in the industry is well aware that this is a house of cards sustained by our willingness to attribute artisanal qualities to industrial commodities and pay accordingly...and hence the taboo to ask for the color of the emperor's new jacket. Let's just keep it from the kids.

But look at it from the other side....is it a crime that as a result of our willingness to overpay for "prestige" and the crass but tangible "landmarks of a fishing life" many a fishing bum, who would otherwise have swelled the ranks of welfare, has found gainfull employment ?. Whose fault is it that so many of us refuse to take the time to master the skills of fishing and prefer the easy fix of a new hyped rod, a magical new fly, the hand-holding of a guide? Not the guy making a dollar providing us with these...not if we are willing to pay.

NMB
01-07-2007, 09:08 PM
A Chevy Will Get You There, But A Mercedes Will Get You There In Style. And There Is A Discernable Difference In The Quality. But Neither Will Do Much For One Who Cannot Drive

HatTrick
01-08-2007, 11:29 AM
Personal preference, budget, and how you treat your equipment should make rod selection relatively easy. Yes, there are scores of choices out there, but the best advice I ever got was "try a wide range, and if you can afford your first choice, great; if not, just scroll down until your budget and your choices intersect". Personally, I am more likely to spend top dollar on a 4wt trout rod that I will pamper, clean carefully and wrap up when I put it to bed. Saltwater rods have a tough life, between corrosion, boats, clousers etc. and the TFO's that I own have performed well. The price of the 8wt TiCrX kept me from jumping off a bridge when I lost it overboard. Anybody looking at saltwater rods should try the TFO's because you will save a good sum of money if your choice and your budget intersect there. Mine did.
The 8wt. TiCrX is a sweet rod. The 10wt. is pretty heavy duty and a little bit of a workout to use for 8 hours straight.

rlbgfish173
01-09-2007, 08:53 PM
I need a Flats boat to get THERE! :) I've never had one complaint from a bonefish about the type of rod I was using however several did complain about my use of Tiemco hooks vs Mustad. --123-3


A Chevy Will Get You There, But A Mercedes Will Get You There In Style. And There Is A Discernable Difference In The Quality. But Neither Will Do Much For One Who Cannot Drive

kent jones
01-09-2007, 11:18 PM
here in alabama off the coast i throw a 14 wt tfo rod fishing for large sharks mine has held up to a 9 ft hamerhead so i dont complain

catspaw
01-10-2007, 06:27 AM
Randrade,

Several years ago I was given a tour of the Thomas & Thomas rod manufacturing plant by Tom Dorsey one of the founding Thomas's. Every thing is designed, fabricated, finished, and tested in house; everything except the reel seat and guides. The amount of work (time) that goes into building a quality rod stateside was an eyeopener. I don't know how they make any profit at any cost to the consumer. T&T likes to keep everything in house to keep a close eye on quality control. Yeah they're expensive but you just have to decide which toys you want to spend your money on. This isn't a T&T ad but the first time I threw one it was like - holy s*** this things a cannon. I've thrown other high end rods but T&T just fits my style of casting. Try them all then decide.

randrade
01-10-2007, 08:00 AM
Randrade,

Several years ago I was given a tour of the Thomas & Thomas rod manufacturing plant by Tom Dorsey one of the founding Thomas's. Every thing is designed, fabricated, finished, and tested in house; everything except the reel seat and guides. The amount of work (time) that goes into building a quality rod stateside was an eyeopener. I don't know how they make any profit at any cost to the consumer. T&T likes to keep everything in house to keep a close eye on quality control. Yeah they're expensive but you just have to decide which toys you want to spend your money on. This isn't a T&T ad but the first time I threw one it was like - holy s*** this things a cannon. I've thrown other high end rods but T&T just fits my style of casting. Try them all then decide.

I agree completely, and I spend more than I should on items for their sheer beauty and the pleasure I get from using them. But rods are discussed and sold mostly in terms of their performance not their beauty, and their price justified on those terms. The reality is that modern "top of the line" carbon fiber rods are very simple objects, less like a Mercedes, to which the marketing Zeitgeist likes to equate them, and more like a Louis Vuitton hand bag. So this approach to discusing rods does not make sense to me.

I am all for beautiful, well made objects and the quiet satisfaction one gets from using such objects. If fishing took me regularly to the chalkstreams of Hampshire I would certainly make it a point to fish classic cane and beautiful hand machined reels. So, yes, I agree with you and think there is great value in your approach. But I also think that in discusing rods, especially as a way to answer a question from someone for whom cost is an issue, it is important to keep the issue of beauty and functionality separate.

RogerStg
01-10-2007, 08:16 AM
For those of you that want a little more beauty in their TFO rods, I lifted this recent press release.

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Press Release:

January 8, 2007

TFO’s 10th Anniversary Special Edition Rods

Ten years ago an idea spawned; to offer high-performance fly rods at affordable prices that would encourage more to enjoy the fly fishing experience. Starting with two-piece 5, 6 and 8 weight rods and a marketing plan to simply ask rod owners to tell their friends about us, Temple Fork Outfitters eventually hatched. With requests for additional rod lengths and weights, TFO began to grow. We added multi-piece rods, our Western and Saltwater Series for traveling anglers. In February, 2003 Lefty Kreh agreed to be involved in the design of all our rods with a common goal: To increase participation in and awareness of fly fishing by offering the best possible combination of price and performance in rods. After casting and analyzing our current production rods, he immediately started working on new designs; the TiCr followed by the TiCrX and Finesse Series.

To celebrate these last 10 years, we have taken two of our most popular rods and decked them out. The 4 piece 10th Anniversary Special Editions will be offered in an 8’9” 5 weight and a 9’ 8 weight. The rich translucent olive blank on the 589 is highlighted with beautiful nickel silver hardware, burled maple spacer and Flor grade cork. The distinctive blue blank on the 890 will be topped off with a polished gun metal blue reel seat with a composite cork fighting butt cap and Flor grade cork. Both rods will come in a TFO logo rod sock and a most unique Special Edition carbon fiber rod tube.

10th Anniversary Special Edition rods will be available in limited numbers, with a MSRP of $299.95. All TFO rods feature our lifetime unconditional warranty. Simply return the damaged rod with $25 for shipping and handling, and we will repair or replace your rod.

Please ask your local dealer about TFO or visit our website www.templeforkflyrods.com for more information

Contact:
Jim Shulin
Temple Fork Outfitters
8115 Sovereign Row
Dallas, TX 75247
(800) 638-9052 Ph
(214) 638-8143 Fax
jim@templeforkflyrods.com
www.templeforkflyrods.com

***

FWIW, the 5 wt uses the finess blank and the 8 wt uses the TiCrX. I did not find any info on their website, but I'm sure some of the sponsors that carry TFO can help you out.

catspaw
01-11-2007, 10:14 AM
Randrade,
I agree, it's not cosmetics. If the rods I use were the ugly sister I would still use them. I didn't start out with in the high end, only after using one did I switch, and I was fortunate enough to be able to afford them. I have always been a proponent of "form follows function". One sould imagine a graph, where affordability and performance intersect is where one should shop.
Tight lines.

Cuttbow
01-11-2007, 05:48 PM
... but I love my TFO rods. I own 3, an 8 wt pro that I use throwing streamers and fishing the Ontario Tributaries with eggs and nymphs for steelies and browns, and a 14 wt. The other is a 15 wt "Blue" that, in the spirit of disclosure, I received to review from Rick Pope. Therein lies my fairest assessment. After fishing the 14 for century class tunas, I found it lacking in "lifting strength" though it cast well. It bottomd out on tuna in the 50-75 class. It was/is a Tarpon/GT rod for big fish on the flats. As I fish bluewater, it was relegated to dorado and wahoo. I sent a few e-mails to Rick, and he listened to me and others reporting the same. First, the market was to slow for blue water rods. 18 mos later, they changed their minds. They listen to anglers and try to accomodate. I received a heavy "blue" with instructions to enjoy it! My preferred heavy tuna stick when IGFA yft are in play is a Cam Sigler 15-17, I use 2 factory rods and a custom rod that was wrapped by the Chef after Cam got me a blank. The TFO blue is a great rod, capable of tunas over 100, sharks, and big trevally. I have 3 "classic" sticks that I consider optimal: The Sage RPL 5wt 4 pc, the Powell AXS 909 3 pc, and the CS 15. My TFO's fill some of the gaps, with pleasure!

bonefishdick
01-21-2007, 12:31 PM
I think it is always good to get the minority view on things AND CONSIDER IT. Try them all then decide, my guess is you will still pick the TFO.