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View Full Version : Tuna: How Long Can You Keep?


billfish
07-15-2007, 03:04 PM
Well, this being the first year that we have been very productive catching tuna, we are starting to freeze it.. Yes, a great feeling to know we'll have some whenever we'd like for dinner!

A few questions, hope someone can advise. I'm sure there will be diferences of opinions (all will help):

1. How long after a days catch can you eat the tuna for sushi, no cook??
2. How long after a days catch can you eat tuna steaks just grilled/pan seared on the outside( rare in the middle)? ** We are vacuum sealing the fish the day of, even for those not being frozen
3. How long will frozen tuna (vacuum sealed) last in a freazer? We noticed some we took out of the freezer (after a few weeks) was "browner" than when it went in. I did trim it up, but was not as good..

**Any tips on cooking frozen tuna thawed out

Thanks for the advise!

~ Bill

north coast
07-15-2007, 03:25 PM
I never freeze it , it just ain't the same. even after a week it starts to get stronger tasting.
couple days On the "raw" question. I eat it like crazy after catching a fish, give most of it away. I don't seem to get tired of it this way. my friends and neighbors that like tuna think I'm a fish god and worship accordingly:) think of it like local corn, turkey on thanksgiving, eggnog,etc. a yearly treat.

BobG
07-15-2007, 05:17 PM
All the tuna that's given to me is of impecible quality, and I keep it REAL cold at home since we eat it only as sushi. Under optimum conditions mine is usually still fine no longer than 4-5 days. If you're going to gril it, you can probably add another day or two to that.
As for freezing, neven done it. That browning you're referring to is called "chocolating". That's common after it's been frozen.

RogerStg
07-15-2007, 05:37 PM
Kept cold, wrapped in a paper towel and plastic wrap, it's good sashimi for a week for me. Figure that by the time you get it from most fish markets it's already 3 to 7 days old any way.

The brown that develops from freezing or long refrigeration is only oxidation and tastes fine.

fishoutawater
07-15-2007, 07:09 PM
About the chocolating. Commercially frozen tuna steaks are exposed to carbon monoxide which keeps the meat bright red after freezing.

Useless trivia, but thats why yours are brown after freezing and the store bought steaks aren't.

There are special sushi freezers that can keep tuna in top sushi shape for months.

With all that cold storage in Glosta you would think we could drop off a tuna and get it butchered, cryovac packed, and stored at -40f for a reasonable fee. Christmas sushi anyone?


D

plumisland
07-15-2007, 07:59 PM
the only thing I would ad to what has already been posted is to be sure ALL the blood meat is trimmed from your steaks prior to freezing as even a thin layer will taint the meat and cause it to be strong tasting.

happytuna
07-15-2007, 08:35 PM
ive caught a giant and the buyer kept it for 3 weeks by trimming it back each day then shiped to japan and he had some to test it out got better with time

billfish
07-16-2007, 09:13 AM
THANKS for the Great advise guys! Gorged myself on tuna yesterday.. :-% To catch a tuna, you must eat like a tuna I guess...


~Bill

TwoLightsKid
07-16-2007, 11:26 AM
I've eaten tuna out of the freezer for over a year after it was caught. If you want to do this, just make sure you vacuum seal it, freeze it immediately after you catch it, and keep your freezer as cold as possible. Sure it's not nearly as good as it was fresh, but it's still great and better than most of what you can buy at a fish market. Plus, there's nothing better than being able to pull tuna that you caught out of the freezer for dinner in January. The toro section doesn't freeze as well due to the higher fat content, and I think you should eat that immediately or smoke it before freezing, but the less fatty sections do just fine.

BobPink
07-16-2007, 06:23 PM
I tried freezing tuna that I pre-cut into steaks and vacuum sealed and it was garbage after 2 months. It has been suggested to me that if I froze it in much larger sections & vacuum sealed it can be quite good for a number of months as long as you trim off about 3/4"-1" from each side before using.

sage fly guy
07-16-2007, 07:49 PM
I tried freezing tuna that I pre-cut into steaks and vacuum sealed and it was garbage after 2 months. It has been suggested to me that if I froze it in much larger sections & vacuum sealed it can be quite good for a number of months as long as you trim off about 3/4"-1" from each side before using.



Last September I froze 3 large chunks of bluefin, probably 6x8in pieces, vacuum sealed and wrote, December, January and February on them. December's piece was fine, damned good, January got you by, but was starting to suffer, February only got eaten as I knew I had many months before I tasted it again. Defrosted each chunk and had trim accordingly larger edge pieces thru the winter.

Next fish I'm going to try larger chunks for sashimi out in 4 one week stages. And some long term freezing of really large pieces of mrguro. You never know, there may come a time when these fish leave and then what will the sashimi-aholics do.

chris

RogerStg
07-16-2007, 09:14 PM
FWIW, it makes a difference how cold the freezer is. I keep fish in a garage freezer that not often opened and kept at its highest setting. Normally its a few degrees below zero

Frankie G
07-17-2007, 08:18 AM
If one was interested, how would one blast CO on the steaks? I HATE freezing the stuff, but if I was to do so, would this make it edible say, 3 months down the road? Would the CO preserve the taste as well as color, or only color?

RogerStg
07-17-2007, 09:15 AM
Would the CO preserve the taste as well as color, or only color?

Just the color - has no effect on the actual taste, though if folks think it won't taste good to them they are almost always right.

parapapam
07-17-2007, 10:22 AM
Last September I froze 3 large chunks of bluefin, probably 6x8in pieces, vacuum sealed and wrote, December, January and February on them. December's piece was fine, damned good, January got you by, but was starting to suffer, February only got eaten as I knew I had many months before I tasted it again.

chris

Chris,

I had just about the same experience with just about the same time frames...
BTW, mine was yellowfin if it makes a difference. 3 - 4 months is about maximum for me, I think.

On other note... Mine wasn't vacume sealed. It was wrapped in sahran wrap and double bagged in zip lock bags using the old "sink it in water to remove the air" trick.

Mike