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View Full Version : Almost fishing- Lobster


BigBoatDog
11-22-2007, 04:31 PM
After a trip with Constant Menace one of my nephews and I have decided to spring for a few traps and try to catch lobsters.
My first question is where to find traps and tackle? Other than herring is there a preferred bait? Where do I get the permits? Those basic sort of questions.
Any help would be appreciated.
BBD

capemike88
11-22-2007, 04:49 PM
Cod racks are considered to be a top bait. Down south they use skate (holds up better in the traps) as well as bluefish racks. From what I gather its pretty much what ever type of dead fish you can get your hands on.

Good luck,

MIke

Bob Parsons
11-22-2007, 09:47 PM
Licence you can get on line, from the mass division of marine fisheriers. Redtop carries pots. I use mostly bluefish that I catch. Red Top now has a product that claims to last for a month. Might be worth it earlier season before I stock up on bait.
Sandwich Marine on Tupper rd over towards the Sandwich marine on the canal also has lobster pots.

capexcape
11-23-2007, 07:12 AM
BBD
I am currently working on a lobster boat out of Plymouth.
We are hauling out the gear now on a daily basis and the captain is selling some of the traps as we haul them out .He has lots to pick from stored at home in Taunton if you are interrested.Or you can meet us in Plymouth at the dock which obviously saves us handling them less.
The liscence you are seeking is commonly referred to as a 10 pot lisc,or family lisc.I have done the 10 pot deal for a few years as well and found it to be enjoyable and rewarding, catching enough for a family lobster dinner weekly.And the best part is it gets you on the water several times a week.The downside is the boat will get messy quick.lots of cleaning if you dont mind it And you need to acquire bait ,sometimes a chore .If you save the racks from the fish you catch this helps otherwise you have to get friends to save it or buy it ,andit is getting quite costly appx 25 to 40 a tote. A tote will last you quite a while though.
Glad to help you on any rec lobstering ques but not on comm.,as they say loose lips sink ships.
Dave

BobG
11-23-2007, 09:46 AM
Setting up 10 traps to satisfy your recreational license can run into some serious $$$.
Easily $600+.
Having done it for years myself, I'd suggest taking a more conservative approach. Make a serious effort ot locate good used traps. You'd be amazed at just how much moey you'll save, and if properly rigged, and repaired, they will fish just as good as a brand new trap.
The part about lobstering, both comm and recreational you never hear much about until it's too late is, the loss of gear. :eek: Depending on where you fish, and how many commercial guys are in your area, losing a lot of traps can be a fact of life, especially if you decide to set your traps in places that already have an abundance of other lobstermen.

As already mentioned, BAIT is a huge issue these days. It's nearly impossible to get in sustainable quantiites. I get mine when I can and freeze it. Even if it means holding it until next season.

Frankie G
11-23-2007, 10:51 AM
Setting up 10 traps to satisfy your recreational license can run into some serious $$$.
Easily $600+.
Having done it for years myself, I'd suggest taking a more conservative approach. Make a serious effort ot locate good used traps. You'd be amazed at just how much moey you'll save, and if properly rigged, and repaired, they will fish just as good as a brand new trap.
The part about lobstering, both comm and recreational you never hear much about until it's too late is, the loss of gear. :eek: Depending on where you fish, and how many commercial guys are in your area, losing a lot of traps can be a fact of life, especially if you decide to set your traps in places that already have an abundance of other lobstermen.

As already mentioned, BAIT is a huge issue these days. It's nearly impossible to get in sustainable quantiites. I get mine when I can and freeze it. Even if it means holding it until next season.



I can second both of these thoughts having done it recreationally for the last 2 seasons. I lost 4 pots my first season and 5 this season. Buy all of your pots used. Better deal.
I fish in well populated areas, but I like to think that a comm. wouldn't cut/steal gear..it's just little old me. Maybe I am being naive. I know I get frustrated when I pull my gear and a comm. trawl is set over mine...hmmmm. how did I get this hernia?? (#$119)I also fish in well traveled waters, and some of my pots have come up with the warp tied back together in some spots, making me think that someone fouled my warp on their prop and decided to be a good guy and tie it back together after unfouled. But, it is a ton of fun, esp. with kids. Plus u almost always catch something of interest e.g. dogfish, striper, hermit crabs, skates etc... no to mention the lobster.
My buddy fished away from all other gear by his lonesome this season and did much better than I did this summer as far as productivity and only lost 1 pot at the end of the season- point is you don't need to fish where everyone else is fishing. I generally move my stuff if I pull and find, as my son calls it, "Crab Nation" in one of my pots. (tons O crabs!)
As far as bait, we take it when we can find it fresh, and the guys in my town who I do it with all invested in bait freezers ( which you can find on the cheap, if not free if you look) and can stock about 6 to 8 weeks of bait in them. It gets you on the water alot and it is nice knowing you are not paying $21 for an overboiled one when you can actually go out and catch a bunch of em. Yeah, there is the cost of fuel, bait, traps, maintenance, etc- but I bot all of my pots used from a lobsterman and just replace some hog rings, runners and bang out any bent traps with a rubber mallet and it's great.

JAVIDANGLER
11-23-2007, 12:46 PM
I had done it for a few years as well. The part about the boat getting dirty and a little banged is a fact of life with lobstering. As for bait, any oily fish.
Herring only last about a day, mackerel, stock up in the spring, bluefish the skins seems to work well, and suprisingly skates. Cod, bass, haddock etc, didn't work well for me. As for the artificail baits, tried them too. They were just OK. If another trap with fish was within a couple hunderd feet, it didn't work.

When you rig them 2-3 to a trawl with buoys on both ends helps from losing them. Also I found an area with little traffic, and that helped alot. As long as the traps are under water at low tide they will fish.

They can also get washed in, it happened to me often. Make sure your lines are good, tie them to a stern eye and pull in different directions.

Good luck

BobG
11-24-2007, 07:01 PM
On more thing. For recreational fishing, there's no need to fish a trap larger than 36". Lots of comm guys, esp along the north shore like 48" traps, and they do fish better in certain places. But, if you're hauling by hand, 4 footers are a bear to pull.:eek: For inshore rec lobstering, a 3 footer is all you need.

capexcape
11-24-2007, 07:02 PM
I agree with most of you here .
As for $ 600.00 for a 10 pot setup, ? I know for sure about half that used ,but professional built ,commercially tested. just E mail me and I will hook you up.
as for bait Redfish mackerel and herring seem to be the best as stated here by others anything oily will do .
As far as getting cut off my experience has been stay out of heavy traffic areas as most I have lost seem to be in that type of area ,some people are just not paying attn and chop you off with prop by accident and innattention.As for commercial guys they seem honest and will not bother you and will quickly tie you back after cutting away the tangles with a double thumb knot.

Btw, the brides really love a lobster dinner with a bottle of wine.

Bob Parsons
11-24-2007, 10:36 PM
Another thought, make sure you know how deep the water is and the length of your lines. 60' feet of rope does not work well in 80' for water. I have 60' rope and in 40' feet of water they will go under at high tide when the current is running.

JAVIDANGLER
11-25-2007, 06:30 PM
One the other side of line length, don't put 60 ft of line in 10 ft of water. You'd deserve to get cut off. Often they guys with extra line in the shallow areas will coil and tie it off a few feet under the buoy.

As for set up for hand pulling, create a loop of line at the base near the runners, keep it short, then tie your trawl or buoy line to this. When hauling this acts as a convient handle to lift the trap from the water. It also helps to keep the trap away from the boat just before lifting. You will get that big boat wake just as the trap is being hauled up.

As for trap size, even the 36 in trap become very heavy by mid season with all the weeds. The bigger ones are almost not doable by hand.

Good luck

Elvis
11-28-2007, 06:20 PM
I didn't see a location for you but t looks like "North Shore"... If so, I'd recommend Winchesters in Gloucester. They make traps of all sizes and are very helpful in setting up new recreational folks.

I'd suggest starting with a few and then adding to get to your 10 if you like it. I have 5 myself and it probably takes a solid 1/2 hour - 45 minutes to get to, haul, clear out, bait and re-set all of them. You'll also see how you deal with having goo all over your boat in mid-summer.

REELKNOTTY
11-29-2007, 09:23 AM
I have been fishing 5 traps for a few season with pretty good success. As for bait I have found that using a combination of fresh bait (bluefish, pogies, skates) works well with some of the synthetic baits out on the market. The fresh bait defiantly fishes better but since I am not able to pull my traps every few days and sometimes go 2 weeks or so between pulling them I like to have the synthetic bait in there so they are still fishing even after the fresh bait has been washed out.