PDA

View Full Version : Question: Times of Fly Line


CO Fisher
05-12-2008, 11:46 PM
I moved here a few months ago and finally got an 8wt rod and reel. My question is; do I need floating or sinking line for stripers? I have always had floating on my 6wt, but trout are a different story. Thank you guys for the help.

ruge13
05-13-2008, 12:02 AM
You fishing from shore around Boston?

If so... Float imho. Maybe an intermediate if you really want to sink something. I got tired of using sink lines around boston from shore. Wrapped too many rocks. and got tired of dragging bottom. Most of the water around the City reachable by fly from shore is 15ft or less anyway. At least you have the option to fish surface flies in addition to weighted flies on a floating line. A sink will limit you too much around here I think.

CO Fisher
05-13-2008, 12:18 AM
I don't have a boat --124-3, so most of my fishing will be from shore or wading.

You fishing from shore around Boston?

If so... Float imho. Maybe an intermediate if you really want to sink something. I got tired of using sink lines around boston from shore. Wrapped too many rocks. and got tired of dragging bottom. Most of the water around the City reachable by fly from shore is 15ft or less anyway. At least you have the option to fish surface flies in addition to weighted flies on a floating line. A sink will limit you too much around here I think.

z-drive
05-13-2008, 01:19 AM
if there's any current, floating doesn't work for me. intermediates work well.

FlyFishFrostie
05-13-2008, 11:38 AM
The best all-round flyline for me for shore fishing is a 150 to 200 grain sinking line, but I occasionally use a floater for fishing poppers, sliders, and crease flies on the surface. In any kind of current when fishing sub-surface, a floater just doesn't get the fly down enough for me, but I generally don't fish weighted flies, such as clousers. Friends who fish heavily weighed clousers often use floating lines, even in strong currents, and usually outfish me.--124-3

A good compromise might be to use a floating line while carrying a couple of six-foot long homemade sink tips that could be attached loop-to-loop in situations where that would be helpful, such as when fishing in stronger currents.

YellowDory
05-13-2008, 12:32 PM
I have never used a floating or intermed line. 300 plus gr shooting head system works great for me in the North Shore. The big fish are down low, that is where you want to be. If you are not losing some gear (flies) you are not getting where the bigger fish are. If you don't get that fly in the white water within a inch or so of the rock, you get fewer hook ups. A few casualties every day but that is the price you pay. My flies float in the whitewater and the heavy line bellies, two strips and BANG. Even on the Cape in thin water, the head system gets it down quick and can kick up sand that the fish see. Correction: 8wt is about 250 gr.; 10 wt is 300+. Dave

ruge13
05-13-2008, 05:12 PM
I don't have a boat --124-3, so most of my fishing will be from shore or wading.

That doesn't matter in bean town. Most boats will fish on the shore lines anyway.

I think a lot of people underestimate surface flies fishing blind in Boston. Most of the better fish I've picked up over the past couple seasons have been on gurglers in 4-10ft of water fishing blind. They have turned into my search patterns rather than the bunny flies I used to use as search patterns. I think its a confidence thing, a lot of people don't have any confidence in floating flies if they can't see feeding fish. It took me a while to get past the stigma that I had to drag bottom to catch fish in Boston. Its true they hang there and you will get bit there but they will come up to. I still fish both and haven't yet seen a large enough difference to make me want to go back to dredging full time.

Slappy
05-13-2008, 05:15 PM
I agree with Ruge--if you are targeting big fish in Boston, fish shallow. The only reason I go into 10' of water is to drift back into 2' of water.

FlyFishFrostie
05-13-2008, 06:44 PM
Also, let's not forget the time of day.

A couple of the posts above were made by those who do much of their fishing after dark, when larger bass often move into and/or will take more readily in shallower water. In daylight, however, with the sun visible or just below the horizon, larger bass biting in shallow water is more of the exception rather than the rule, except at times during the fall migration, at least in my case.

The ideal shore fishing situation in daylight hours of being close to a dropoff with a current usually requires getting the fly down closer to the bottom. This requires a sinking line and/or a weighted fly, even a 350+ grain line as someone mentioned above.

Also, I think it's intersting how some of these shallow-water flyfishing proponents spend a lot of their fishing time paddling, peddling, or motoring around in submarine chasers equiped with electronic fish finders, etc. If shallow water was the best place to find stripers most of the time, why the need for sonar equipment?

Famous authors/flyfishermen Ed Mitchell and Lou Tabory generally recommend sinking or intermediate lines from shore most of the time, although Kenny Abrames often uses floating lines, especially after dark.

I think if you took a poll of all NE saltwater flyfishermen, you'd find that the great majority fish with sinking lines the majority of their time, and those who don't probably use weighted flies most of the time. I love striper fishing on the surface, where takes are visual (in daylight) and more excitng, but I find that only 10-20% of my time is productively spent fishing that way and almost never when the sun is visible.

CO Fisher
05-13-2008, 06:55 PM
wow, thanks for all the info. There is a lot to think about. Looks like some sort of sinking line is needed most of the time, and maybe a backup spool with floating line might be the answer.:confused:

fly
05-13-2008, 07:49 PM
I never fish in Boston or N shore with a floating line. It's not by choice, I've just never needed to. Almost always intermediate - unless I am in a boat or my yak, in which case I'll bring along a second rod with a shooting head in case things are slow. I also find deep fishing boring, somehow. 90% of the time I am wading, fishing intermediate. Like Ruge, I love gurglers. I tie them double thick so the intermediate does not wreck the action. With my intermediate I can fish down to 20 feet +, with a unweighted fly, assuming not too much current. With fast current I can still get to 10+ with a clouser or similar.

Having said that, almost all the fish I catch are in the top 1-5 feet or on the top itself.

If I had to replace all my tackle I don't think I'd bother to buy a floater.

ruge13
05-14-2008, 01:57 PM
submarine chasers

Submarine chasers, I like that:)

Good point about light, never really thought of it that way. I can honestly say 80-90% of the fishing I do is in daylight hours.