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  #1  
Old 06-06-2002, 01:37 PM
bb1 bb1 is offline
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Choosing a fishing kayak?

Do most pick a short (12'), wide (28") stable yak, w/ a large open cockpit, like a Loon or Pungo, or should I go for more of a ocean going yak for fishing Cape waters.

I may want to do a little beach/bay fishing along with small rivers and marshes.

What do you guys use?
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Old 06-06-2002, 02:00 PM
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ruge13 ruge13 is offline
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you just opened a big can o worms......
What type of fishing will you be doing? What kinds of water will you be in? Have you used a yak before?
I use a Perception Corona....NOT a fishing boat by any means but I love it. It is 14' 7" and 22 1/4 inches wide. A very tippy boat with exelent handling and secondary stability. I love it but I wanted a longer skinny boat to travel long distances in any type of water, I fish anywhere I think there might be fish, sometimes in a protected bay, sometimes deep in open water. I don;t have any restrictions with the boat type. whether I feel like paddling against 3 ft swells or drifting in calm water is the only decision I have to make. This decision really depends on where you will be fising and how you like to fish. I don't mind paddleing a long distance to fish... I like to go places. I wouldn' recomend the boat I have for fishing. I use ti to fish but I definately didn;t get it just to fish. When I say where you wil be fishing I mean what kinds of water will you be seeing and how fardo you need to go versus your ability. The boat I have is great for me, its highly maneuverable and I can take it in open water if I want to. I am comfortable. I used to have a pungo and I loved it in calm water but I would not be comfortable trying to paddle to islands in boston harbor like I am now in this boat. Pungo's are great, I loved mine. Its a stable boat and great for fishing but it might not suit your needs. There is so much to concider....
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Old 06-06-2002, 02:15 PM
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I may want to do a little beach/bay fishing along with small rivers and marshes.

if this is what you are planning...a pungo would be great, but try it first, you may like the faster boats.....

one thing I miss about the pungo is the cockpit....stripping was easy...now I have to be carefull where the line goes when using anything but floating because I don;t have a cockpit to strip into. I have stripped to the water in my new boat in shallow water and had my line with an intermediate 2.5 sink rate rap around muscle beds and weeds just under the surface.....not good
anyway, try all the boats you can, even ones you are not interested in...you can learn alot from just beating on all the boats you can get into...
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Old 06-07-2002, 12:42 PM
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Never set foot in a yak before, but always had a boat of some kind...my local dealer said I could use a Pungo most anywhere in sight if land (weather permiting) on the Cape.
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Old 06-07-2002, 02:24 PM
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your dealer is right....you can use a pungo anywhere in sight, but you must know the limitations. This was a topic in this forum a litle while back...can you take a pungo in open water...sure go crazy, have a ball, I used to all the time. But don't be nieve about it by not trying some other boats as well. A pungo is a barge compared to skinny boats. You can go anywhere, as with another boat, but paddling a pungo out into heavy water against wind and currents is a bitch, it can be done, but you WILL be tired quickly by having to not only paddle to go forward, but alo to correct for a shorter stockier boat's movement against or with wind and currents and waves. Thats why I got a new boat. I could have taken my pungo all over but I got tired of fighting the water. Now I don't have to fight at all. Thats all I meant by what I said. Pungos are great, but will be out performed 10 to 1 by skinny longer boats in different water types. I love my boat because of its handling in all water types. I miss the stability of a pungo in calmer water though. Fishing was definately easier and more comfortable in a pungo for most situations, but this is the compromise you have to decide on, skinny fast less effort to paddle less comfortable to fish, or great to fish harder to paddle more stable boat. I go long distances to fish in all kinds of wind and weather, I chose skinny fast because I didn;t want o have any restrictions or ever feel like I couldn;t handle wether or water because of my boat. I will fish in any condition, there is nothing more frustrating than not going out in your boat because you think it might be dangerous or too hard to fish. If I didn;t go because I hurt my shoulder or was tired..fine, I can live with that, but if its because I don;t think the boat can handle it...I would be ****ed. just my opinion. If I were to stay in bays and calmer water with better weather conditions I would have chose a pungo. I used to have one and just got tired of having to think twice all the time and I didn;t want any performance issues. Anyway, good luck with your search...try all kinds of boats...
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Old 06-07-2002, 02:54 PM
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ruge 13,
My dealer said the Pungo is 'the' yak for fishing...even thought he sells Old Town and Perception. With the OT Loon 138 or Adventure XL a far second. (I like that new Adventure XL but $)

I went in looking for a sea yak and he said the Pungo is all I would need...I was surprised. I will not be going out in the rougher water, and unlike you, will just fish from shore when conditions are not right.

I will be fishng w/ all kinds of gear...fly, spinner + baitcast/conventional. The dealer said that if I hook a large striper in a skinny yak, I will end up in the water, right away...and I believe him!
The Pungo may even be a challange to begin with...it will replace my 12' Sears Gamefisher w/ a Minn Kota that I just don't take with me any more.

Thanks for all the info., it helped greatly. Some day I may even get into open water kayaking.
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Old 06-07-2002, 03:35 PM
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your dealer was right....the pungo is a really really good kayak for fishing. That is a good decision if you fish with different types of gear too. I love my boat but I do miss the large cockpit and being able to keep more gear in my lap. That and with the pungo I coul clip the paddle because I was comfortable without it..in this boat I keep one hand on the paddle and one on the rod sort of speak. Unless its really calm I always have the paddle in my lap. He was right about a large fish flipping a skinny boat. I get a little nervous when I get turned perpendicular to my line. Fortunately with a rudder system I can correct that most of the time. Unfortunately I haven;t hooked anything big enough to give me a problem yet but I do set my drag rediculously light when I can't keep the boat parrallel or I am trawling that way I won't get pulled over with a strike. Everyone I talked to that fished skinny boats said the same thing, be carefull. If I get a fish big enough to pull me over I would be happy...it would be a good day!! I would be sure to get pictures... Anyway, good luck and happy hunting...fishing I mean....
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Old 06-08-2002, 11:45 AM
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When I first went in looking for a sea yak, I wanted one for the smaller cockpit they have...so I would get less water in it in rough water. But I guess you can put a hood over the open area up forward if you need.

The dealer said people in the Northwest use Pungos to fish Halibut on the bottom w/ hand lines...a rod would give them to much leverage.

Well, time to sell my boat and get a yak.
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Old 06-10-2002, 10:36 AM
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My 2 cents:
Look at a WS Tarpon. I usually fish from a sea kayak but bought a Tarpon as a second boat for wife, kids and friends to use, and for jumping in and out to fish flats or surf launching. It's also for places where I know I'd regret banging up my sea kayak. The Tarpon handles much like a sea kayak, good speed and stability, could even do some touring if you wanted. And IMHO, a SOT is a good choice for a fisherman who wants to yak, especially if he's not prepared to put in the effort that it takes to learn to paddle a traditional safely. If you dump it, you right it and climb back on.
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Old 06-10-2002, 11:44 AM
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WOW...I didn't even realize there was a separate 'kayak' forum!

I do not have a WS catalog, but isn't the Tarpon a sit on top? I want a sit in side for sure <lol>
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  #11  
Old 06-11-2002, 08:28 AM
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fishing kayak.

I fish out of a loon 138, It is faster and a good bit more stable than a pungo. Also it has a much higher load capacity. I weigh a good bit more than is really healthy and the pungo is too close to its design limits with me in it. I know people who fish from them and have a great time. The sit on top contingent seems to be growing all the time, and if the weather is good they can be a blast. When you try your boat out bring all your gear and some water as well as a rod. These are small boats and 20 lbs of gear affects them quite a bit more than you would think possible. Also Try several padlles in various lengths.
have fun and good fishing.EKG
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  #12  
Old 06-11-2002, 11:52 AM
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stable

EKG, My local dealer sells both, and pushes the Pungo as a more stable boat...and explained it in detail...about the V hull in chop and all. He also said that the Pungo's listed capacity was a "true" weight...as if others were pushing it.

He also hinted that the Pungo had better sea handling...
And the 138 weighs 5 more Lb.

I really liked the Loon for its 3ply construction, and did not like the chunk of foam in the bow + stern of the Pungo (it looked like it could fall right out...and let the boat sink!)

Does the Loon 138 really paddle that much easier? That would be great...but can I take it everwhere the Pungo can go?
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Old 06-12-2002, 02:10 PM
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re loonvs pungo

I almost bought a Pungo. The loon 138 was longer faster and behaved better with me in it than the Pungo. That being said I would wonder about which boat has the better margin for the dealer. The crosslink construction is definitle a plus. It floats full of water. I tried it. The bow is higher and seems to have a better entry. also the Loon is over a foot longer. That lenght is in the middle where it helps most with capacity. By the way I am just about at the rated capacity of the Pungo. The Loon handles me and my gear with ease. Also the sliding seat makes loadind and trimming the boat a breeze. I take my Loon in rough water.fairly often and feel safe. I also am a firm believer in pfd's. Get your gear together and try both boats loaded on a breezy day. One thing I did add was the rudder. Makes controlling a big fish much easier and aids greatly when the wind and waves are cooperating against you. Hope this helps. Good fishing let me know how you make out EKG
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Old 06-12-2002, 02:27 PM
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I own both the pungo and loon 138 ( Suspense was killing me. I had to have both:-) . I think the loon is a better choice for big paddlers ( over 225/6') as it takes a bit more draft to get it tracking as well as the shorter pungo. The pungo is slightly better/ and feels more stable in rough water( for my 5'8" 180 frame.) It also sheads wind better/ weathercocks less for me. The loon is slightly faster/ more efficeient so is my choice for longer distance paddles. I don't think you could go too wrong with either. Both are very stable and well behaved in most conditions. ( When it's to rough for a yak, it's too rough to flyfish anyway.) Terrific choices and at home in local rivers, estuaries and open bays. You might go to a dealer ( sakonnet boat house?) that sells both. Allot of it is subjective and a "personal " thing. Price is about a wash. Email me if I can be of more help.
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Old 06-12-2002, 03:11 PM
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my size

I am 6', 185-190...would the Loon 111 we enough for me? I will probably have all my tackle in a PFD w/ pockets. (Loon 120 w/ small cockpit?)

If the stability of the Loon and Pungo are about the same, I would go with the more efficent Loon.
(but I bought a mountan bike for the comfort of the big tires <lol>)

I was told that the Pungo handled the rougher stuff because of the V-bottom and a sea yak style bow.

And the Loon was better in the calmer water w/ a flatter bottom and recreational shape.

Wish I could try both...side by side!
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