Forum Navigation

New Posts

Search


Go Back   Reel-Time Forums > Regional Discussion Forums > New England

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-12-2000, 11:12 PM
JohnMendelson JohnMendelson is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 6
Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

I am thinking of purchasing a Wilderness Systems Ride for use around Newburyport and the Vineyard. I was wondering if anyone has one and can attest to its stability, performance etc?

My only concern is that its an open cockpit boat and spray and waves wreaking havoc.

Thanks.

John

Oh and whats the earliest anyone's caught a striper in the Merrimac?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-13-2000, 06:31 AM
bass3six's Avatar
bass3six bass3six is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Location: Gloucester, Ma.
Posts: 416
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

John,
I too am looking at kayaks for this upcoming season. I am not familiar with the kayak that you mentioned. A few guys insist on a Pungo. I'm leaning towards an Old Town. Although a friend has a couple of older kayaks I may take a look at.
As for the earliest Merrimack River bass...usually the second or third week of May on average for me. The earliest I have landed any schoolies has been the first week of May. There are always rumors of someone catching "holdovers" around the third week of April.
If you do kayak the Merrimack, I'll probably bump into you this season....best of luck. Post whatever model you end up with.
Doug B.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-13-2000, 10:55 AM
Adam-Albino Adam-Albino is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 192
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

You guy's should check the archives, there has been a lot of great info on picking kayaks for the NE area over the years.

Type:
The consensous is stay away from the sit-on-top types (like the "Ride"). While these are fine for the summer and warmer water climates they will really cut down on your season. They can get down-right dangerous, IMO, when the water temps head south. I use my sit-in all year without an issue.

Make:
There are lots of good makes and styles with pro's and cons, but as Mike Powers say's : "Pungo, Pungo, Pungo". Seems to get the higest marks for an all around "does everything, but nothing best" type 'yak.

My feeling is you should hit someplace - like the Goose Hummock on the Cape - where you can try them out. Bring a rod along and try several types/styles. Some are better then others for things like storage, gear, tracking, fishing, etc. Good Luck....
<IMG align=baseline alt="" border=0 hspace=0 src="http://photos.netclubs.com/live/photos/v/9/t/2/t2c710a3839h31nr004cfcdhuo/flyman2.gif">
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-13-2000, 07:21 PM
rwolson rwolson is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 119
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

I have heard everyone mention Pungo too and it rceives high ratings from those people. Another brand to checkout the web is Tribalnce (www.tribalance.com) I watched the videos and see a guy standing while casting and doing other unconventional behaviour in a kayak. He's kind of jumping in his kayak. The kayak looks very stable.

The nearest dealer to Plum Island I believe is in Rowley on Rte 1.

Check out Tribalance's web site for direction. Also, let me know what you decide because I too am in the market for a kayak.

Rich
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-14-2000, 01:45 AM
CEWh CEWh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 19
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

I hope I can help you out here since I bought a kayak last summer and I LOVE IT. First of all, definitely don't buy one unless you actually try it out. I did a test run of many models at the Charles River Canoe Rental place in Newton. They have many models available to test, including the Pungo, and they are enthusiastic about letting people test them because they know that's the best way to sell them. I originally was planning on the Pungo because of the good price and because it was relatively light weight and appeared spacious. However, when I gave it a paddle I absolutely hated it. It is really tippy and was too spacious in my opinion. However, a bigger person may find the extra space a necessity. I am 5'11" and 160 lbs and I prefer to have my knees covered under the kayak both for sun protection and because you use your knees to brace yourself against the sides when paddling or maneuvering quickly. Your knees are NOT covered in the Pungo and I feel that water from occasional big waves can easily enter the cockpit. I want to fish, not give my dog a ride, understand? When I tried the Perception Acadia (www.kayaker.com) I really fell in love with it. I tried other kayaks and I found nothing as nice as the Acadia. To me, its well worth the extra hundred bucks. Here's why I like it: first of all, it is only 50 lbs and therefore easy to load and carry. I load my on a little Honda CRX with no problems. Secondly, it is made of a durable plastic so I don't worry about paddling over occasional rocks or onto shores with lots of shells etc...it gets a little scratched, but so far it's holding up well. Thirdly, it's relatively stable on the water since it has a flat bottom with rib grooves to maintain position; and it handles really well. On a tippy kayak like the Pungo you burn a lot of calories and are constantly stressed by just staying balanced; not so with the Acadia, it's very stable. I have even fish on water with 1ft waves. Finally, and most important, it has just enough room in the front for putting your fly line. I put a small tackle box containing flys and leaders between my legs up underneath and I strip the line "Lefty style" into the cockpit between my legs. There is plenty of storage space behind the seat and a backpack strapped in front is easilty accessible. My kayak is colored yellow and is really stealthy. I regularly fished the Weymouth area around Grape and Slate Islands last summer and got into a lot of schoolie action by following the birds early in the morning. It was a great time and the fish were not at all scared by the kayak, often chasing my flies right up to the side of the boat. I hooked into some big fish that took me on a few "sled rides". I also went to the Wilmington Show and Lou Tabory was right, the big ones hang around below the schoolies and like to take half-in-halfs and Ray's flies fished deep with a sinking line.

Best of luck,

CEWh

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-14-2000, 01:45 AM
CEWh CEWh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 19
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

I hope I can help you out here since I bought a kayak last summer and I LOVE IT. First of all, definitely don't buy one unless you actually try it out. I did a test run of many models at the Charles River Canoe Rental place in Newton. They have many models available to test, including the Pungo, and they are enthusiastic about letting people test them because they know that's the best way to sell them. I originally was planning on the Pungo because of the good price and because it was relatively light weight and appeared spacious. However, when I gave it a paddle I absolutely hated it. It is really tippy and was too spacious in my opinion. However, a bigger person may find the extra space a necessity. I am 5'11" and 160 lbs and I prefer to have my knees covered under the kayak both for sun protection and because you use your knees to brace yourself against the sides when paddling or maneuvering quickly. Your knees are NOT covered in the Pungo and I feel that water from occasional big waves can easily enter the cockpit. I want to fish, not give my dog a ride, understand? When I tried the Perception Acadia (www.kayaker.com) I really fell in love with it. I tried other kayaks and I found nothing as nice as the Acadia. To me, its well worth the extra hundred bucks. Here's why I like it: first of all, it is only 50 lbs and therefore easy to load and carry. I load my on a little Honda CRX with no problems. Secondly, it is made of a durable plastic so I don't worry about paddling over occasional rocks or onto shores with lots of shells etc...it gets a little scratched, but so far it's holding up well. Thirdly, it's relatively stable on the water since it has a flat bottom with rib grooves to maintain position; and it handles really well. On a tippy kayak like the Pungo you burn a lot of calories and are constantly stressed by just staying balanced; not so with the Acadia, it's very stable. I have even fish on water with 1ft waves. Finally, and most important, it has just enough room in the front for putting your fly line. I put a small tackle box containing flys and leaders between my legs up underneath and I strip the line "Lefty style" into the cockpit between my legs. There is plenty of storage space behind the seat and a backpack strapped in front is easilty accessible. My kayak is colored yellow and is really stealthy. I regularly fished the Weymouth area around Grape and Slate Islands last summer and got into a lot of schoolie action by following the birds early in the morning. It was a great time and the fish were not at all scared by the kayak, often chasing my flies right up to the side of the boat. I hooked into some big fish that took me on a few "sled rides". I also went to the Wilmington Show and Lou Tabory was right, the big ones hang around below the schoolies and like to take half-in-halfs and Ray's flies fished deep with a sinking line.

Best of luck,

CEWh

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-14-2000, 01:55 AM
CEWh CEWh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 19
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

Just for your info, you definitely can't stand in a Perception Acadia, but it is possible to get the legs out from underneath to stretch them. I think that Tribalance is a neat concept. I have considered modifying my Acadia in a similar manner to see if I could get enough stability to stand. There is a groove in the back of the Acadia where a PVC pipe with floats on each end might be attached. However, I think it might interfere with paddling, so I'm thinking of possibly rigging something further back. That's what I like about kayaks, you can get creative with them without dishing out a lot of dough.

Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-14-2000, 09:05 AM
ChadSkinner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

John, you may want to consider a canoe. Your concerns about the open cockpit are just the start of the problems with a kayak and fly fishing. I posted in Ny. NJ. so I won't repeat myself to much. I have a 13' canoe that I have no problem putting on top of my Honda. I fish the Merrimack a lot by the way, and never had trouble. First fish, or earliest fish last year mid April. You will be dryer and less agrivated in a canoe. I can keep up with kayaks, and have gone places they are to chicken to go. Oh I have also raced kayaks in white water courses and have kayaked in the ocean long before it was popular.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-14-2000, 12:41 PM
MichaelPowers MichaelPowers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 52
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

Adam pretty much summed up my opinion ("pungo, pungo, pungo"), but CEWh prompts me to add some more info.

1) Tippy? The Pungo has drawbacks, but that ain't one of them. I don't think you could tip it under halfway normal conditions if you tried.

2) Open cockpit. This is something I looked for for a couple of reasons: (a) I wanted to be able to get in and out fairly easily, using the kayak as transpo to get me to places where I would fish from shore. In practice I do this less than I'd anticipated and tend to stay in the boat when I'm in the boat; (b) escape -- I wanted to be able to bail out easily if I tipped. Well, I've never tipped or come close. I do find that it will take on water when waves crash over the bow, and a closed cockpit would keep more water out. I have a spray skirt which keeps casual water out, but still worry about swamping.

You should stay within your limits in any boat and avoid the kind of conditions that could create problems, but it is worth considering what happens when you accidentally get beyond your limits.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-14-2000, 10:54 PM
CEWh CEWh is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 19
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

Mr. Powers,
Perhaps I should have said the Pungo is "wobbly". When I tried it last year, I noticed that the hull of the Pungo was more of a "V-hull" in the mid section and then it flares outward on the outer sides; this ability to lean the boat makes it very maneuvarable and it does stabalize when tilted far on the side. However, I prefer to cast sitting strait up without a lot of rocking because it can wear on the back muscles (my many years experience from small jon boats and canoes bass bugging in Florida). The Acadia has more of a flat bottom in the mid section so it doesn't rock as easily, but if it goes over on the side to far it might in fact tip more easily then the Pungo. I think the Acadia hull structure is more akin to a canoe than a kayak. Regardless, I think any potential kayak buyer should give 'em a good and thorough test run before making the final decision, wouldn't you agree?

To address another issue, can any reel-timers out there provide some advice on good places that they have fished by kayak? I am hoping to branch out this season to some new locations in the Boston Harbor besides the Weymouth Back River/Grape Island locale. Moreover, I would like to try putting in at the Union Street Bridge canoe launch and floating down the North River on the outgoing to Damon's Point or beyond and then floating back up with the incoming. Has anyone done this and is it a relatively safe trip? I have heard that the currents can be dangerous in certain spots. Also, has anyone taken a similar strategy to fish the Westport river/Horseneck beach area? Finally, has anyone fished more open ocean like at the Monomoy flats or off Scusset beach by kayak or is that totally nuts?
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-15-2000, 06:21 PM
MichaelPowers MichaelPowers is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 52
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

>>Finally, has anyone fished more open ocean like at the Monomoy flats or off Scusset beach by kayak or is that totally nuts? <<

Totally nuts? Now we're in a realm of my expertise <g>.

Yes, I've kayaked to Monomoy several times. Once all the way to the end of the South Island. The mouth of Stage Harbor can be tricky, but is usually a pretty easy trip. Kayaks suck for fishing the flats, because you're so low to the water that when you spot fish they spot you. Do you know how fast a striper can do a 180 degree turn?

Damon's Pt. and outward? That's my home turf. The mouth of the North can be fearsomely nasty, or it can be glass. Wind out of the East and a dropping tide and you won't want to do it in a lobster boat. Slacker tides and currents are generally fine. There's also lots of good poking around to do in the various marsh creeks that empty into the North in that area.

I do not recommend the following to anyone, and I {probably} won't do it again, but I've even taken the Pungo a mile or more offshore to Succonesset for a bluefish blitz. The weather changed on me as I was coming in and I turned around to see a solid fog bank that could have made for real trouble if I'd stayed on the water another 10 minutes.

Generally, I'd stick within 1/4 mile of a shore, any shore, so you can beat a safe retreat if things get mean.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-15-2000, 11:32 PM
MarkD MarkD is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Before Nov. 1999
Posts: 29
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

I bought an "old school" whitewater kayak last year for $50. $100 in accessories and epoxy later, I have what I refer to as the Mad Maxx Yak.

It certainly is not the most efficient craft as far as tracking is concerned. It floats though, was inexpensive, and will do the trick for my day trip/fishing duties.

My advice on the North River would be to exercise serious caution. I've put in at the Union St. ramp and it can be harsh on an outgoing tide. You'll be to busy paddling to fish effectively. Also, Damon's can get hairy as well. I suggest putting in at the Driftway in Scituate and paddling down towards the mouth of the North. Once again, be careful at the mouth. My brother and I thought it would be a simple paddle to cross at the mouth, with an outgoing tide, to check out the jetty. It took about ten seconds to realize that we were in over our heads. It took another five minutes of full bore paddling to get out of the current and back to the sand bar.

This will be my firt year fishing out of a kayak so I second the request for information or suggestions. I plan on hitting the waters off Wollaston beach. Last year there was a guy in a canoe, about 200 yards off shore, cleaning up while I was up to my arm pits, fly casting to no avail.

Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-16-2000, 11:49 PM
Bob Parsons's Avatar
Bob Parsons Bob Parsons is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Mar 1996
Location: Barnstable
Posts: 7,201
RE: Kayaks for Coastal FFishing/Merrimac River Bass

Looking for somewhere new to try your yak?

How about Barnstable Harbor? You could use it to access the sandbars leading out to Cape Cod Bay. Or head up into the marsh. At low tide you could even fish some of the channels that would be unreachable by power boat. I hiked in over a sand bar to fish some and it was almost like river creek fishing.

Regardless of where you fish, you should consider having a compass or better yet a gps as part of your gear. Mike talks about fog rolling in at Succonessit, I 'v been there and was very glad to have a GPS.

The semi v bottom makes it track better than a flat bottom, once your used to them, they are fine. (white water boats have a more rounded bottom, built for dodging rocks and catching eddies etc.)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bass River advice Rexhamer New England 9 08-16-2003 09:08 PM
To anyone involved with Stripers Forever flatts1 Conservation and Ecology 5 04-16-2003 12:34 PM
bass river..canal bobmon New England 1 05-06-2002 12:48 AM
Hudson River Striped Bass RJ New England 1 04-02-2002 05:21 PM
tried bass river stolgi New England 0 05-03-2001 10:34 PM



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 AM.




vBulletin skin developed by: eXtremepixels
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.


Copyright 1995-2013, Cahill Digital