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  #1  
Old 03-21-2000, 08:04 AM
josko josko is offline
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Offshore first aid kit

I was just sorting through my first aid kit, and it occured to me I'm really not prepared to use it. Perhaps a better way to go about this is to figure out what sort of injuries one needs to be prepared for on a day (overnight) offshore trip, and then stock the kit accordingly. I probably don't need my beesting swabs...

So the question is: what injuries should you reasonably expect and be prepared for out there? A couple of obvious ones are embedded hooks and broken bones, possibly open, bleeding fractures. What else? I'm assuming the USCG can get to you within a couple of hours and that they'd actually do it if you had a broken bleeding femur on board or a fishook in a draining eye.

Here's a chance for all you ghouls to pitch in. What does one need to be prepared for, and what are the needed first aid kit components for those injuries?
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  #2  
Old 03-21-2000, 06:44 PM
gfm gfm is offline
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RE: Offshore first aid kit

Shark Bite
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  #3  
Old 03-21-2000, 10:33 PM
BillySalmonhole BillySalmonhole is offline
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RE: Offshore first aid kit

HEY JOSKO,

I THINK THIS IS A GOOD SUBJECT TO EXPLORE OR AT LEAST CONTEMPLATE. HOW PREPARE YOU ARE, RATHER HOW QUICKLY YOUR ABLE TO PROVIDE INITIAL TREATMENT TO AN INJURY CAN MAKE A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE IN THE FINAL OUTCOME. OF THE MANY TYPES OF INJURIES THAT COULD OCCUR ON A BOAT THE INJURIES THAT FIRST COME TO MIND ARE BROKEN BONES AND INJURIES THAT INVOLVE HEMMORRHAGE.

WITH BONE FRACTURES, YOUR GOAL SHOULD BE TO STABILIZE THE FRACTURED SEGMENTS WITH SOMETHING RIGID UNTIL MORE DEFINITVE TRATMENT CAN BE RENDERED. THERE ARE PLENTY OF THINGS ON A BOAT THAT CAN ACCOMPLISH THIS (IE. A SCRUB BRUSH HANDLE) WITH A ACE BANDAGE OR TWO.

SOME CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE GIVEN AS TO HOW YOU CAN STABILIZE A NECK OR SPINAL CORD INJURY FROM FALLING FROM TOWER OR BRIDGE, OR SIMPLY SLIPPING ON A SLICK DECK. WHEN YOU SUSPECT SOMEONE MAY HAVE A SPINAL CORD INJURY IT IS IMPORTANT NOT TO MOVE THE INJURED PERSON WHICH MAY CAUSE GREATER INJURY. SUPPORTING THE PERSON'S POSITION ON THE DECK OR THEIR NECK WITH PFT DEVICES MAY BE HELPFUL.

THERE ARE THREE VERY IMPORTANT WAYS TO CONTROL BLEEDING FROM ANY TYPE OF HEMMORRAGIC INJURY: 1. PRESSURE, 2. PRESSURE!, 3. PRESSURE!!!!! IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO APPLIED AS MUCH PRESSURE AS POSSIBLE TO A BLEEDING WOUND IMMEADIATELY. ONE SHOULD HAVE A GENEROUS SUPPLY OF GAUZE PADS ON BOARD, ALTHOUGH A T-SHIRT COULD BE USED IN EMERGENCY.

IN ADDITION, EVERYONE SHOULD BE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE SOMEONE HAVING A "HEART ATTACK" AND BE PREPARED TO DEAL WITH IT IN SOME FASHION. I WOULD ENCOURAGE EVERYONE TO CONTACT THEIR LOCAL FIRE DEPT. TO SEE IF A CPR AND/ OR A BASIC FIRST AID COURSE IS AVAILABLE.

LASTLY, OTHER INJURIES RELATED TO BOATING THAT I HAVE BEEN INVOLVED IN MANAGING IN AN EMERGENCY DEPT. INCLUDE: AVULSED TEETH(IMPORTANT TO GET BACK IN THE MOUTH ASAP, OR A CUP MILK TEMPORARILY), DEGLOVING WOUNDS TO LIMBS FROM PROPELLER(NEED I SAY MORE), LOSS OF DIGITS FROM WHEN A HEAVY HATCH FALLS ON SOMEONES FINGER(PACK IT IN ICE), THE LIST GOES ON...

YOU CAN NEVER BE PREPARED FOR EVERYTHING, BUT ANTICIPATING WHAT MIGHT HAPPEN AS YOU ARE DOING IS A GOOD START.

GOOD LUCK AND SAFE FISHING,
BILLY

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Old 03-22-2000, 09:44 AM
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Mark Cahill Mark Cahill is offline
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RE: Offshore first aid kit

Plenty of hyd peroxide to clean wounds, perhaps an air cast to imoblize leg or arm fractures.

We used to carry a suture kit, gloves, spray skin freeze, and scalpel (of course, we also had a physician with us 90% of the time). Never had to do any sutures, but we did remove some smaller hooks on occasion. Don't even think about bringing anything that needs a syringe, otherwise your next CG boarding will be really interesting.

Remember, nothing gets infected like a fishing wound. Clean 'em out well and keep them covered.


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Old 03-28-2000, 08:13 PM
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Bob Parsons Bob Parsons is offline
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RE: Offshore first aid kit

Arhhhh I can see Capt Josko's dilemma. Should he use the bottom half of his new $700 Loomis GLX 12 wt to splint someone's broken leg? Just duct tape him to the deck.

How about a body bag? Don't want to stare at him for the 2-3 hours to return to the dock.
Especially if the fish are biting and you want to stay a bit to fish before heading in.
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