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  #31  
Old 10-02-2004, 12:24 PM
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mdrew9 mdrew9 is offline
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Shaun, in post #16 you showed a picture of Isopods are these also known as krill? What type of patterns do you use when fish are feeding on these krill?
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  #32  
Old 10-03-2004, 09:17 PM
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nope, close, but a little different. This is a krill, more like a shrimp where the isopod (scud) is more like a potato bug. Got this from Google

As for what to imitate them, a woolly bugger probably would have worked. But, problem was the bass would just swim with thier mouth open and ignore everything else. I chose the big and obnoxious rather than match the hatch that time..
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  #33  
Old 10-11-2004, 01:12 PM
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Silversides

Are everywhere most of the year. Range in size from an inch to 6" plus. Popovic mentions things to note in his Pop Fleyes book, the eye proportions and orientation n the head. The transparency, and the size and shape of the stomach sac.

Also, they have Chartruce dots on thier head, similar to the bunker pictures. These were taken on the south East Cape.
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  #34  
Old 10-11-2004, 01:16 PM
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Lady Crab

Sandy bottoms. Burrowing crab. Some what transparrent when small. Claws have a lot of red coloration and are sharp, not round and blunt like a rock crab. Otherwise sandy spotted color on carapace. Has swimmers like a blue crab as well. Found all over the NE. These pictures are from RI and Cape Cod Bay.
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  #35  
Old 11-29-2004, 03:36 AM
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Shaun, some great photo's there mate like the squid ones the most given me few ideas for the kingfish season here in Oz! Nasty buggers are really structure orientated and will happily skunk you around any nearby snag, bommie, mooring line, outboard leg, bouy etc etc wonderful way of losing a few flylines.
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  #36  
Old 02-07-2005, 10:39 AM
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Mole Crabs

Pics are not the best. I will get better.
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  #37  
Old 02-07-2005, 10:41 AM
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Worms

This is the first edition of the new improved Bait gallery...more to come in the future...

Anyway, found in just about every square inch of sandy muddy and rocky bottom. Anywhere they can burrow you can find them. Prolific in marsh areas with muddy bottoms.

Do, Bass just gulp a bunch of sand and hope to get a worm or two? Nope.. Sensing is usually not visual. If it was visual, a few are crawling around here and there, or when they are breeding, but a majority of worms feed by sitting just under the sands surface and pushing filiments above the sand. Usually these are pretty visable and can be an easy way to detect a worm below the surface.
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Last edited by ruge13; 02-08-2005 at 04:10 PM..
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  #38  
Old 02-17-2005, 10:58 PM
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Shaun,
Maybe we should try to convince our esteemed, albeit overworked and underpaid, editor to set up or let you set up this collection in the pattern section for tyers to use as a model?
Mark?
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  #39  
Old 05-16-2005, 12:41 PM
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Long Fin Squid

These are more recent, from last week (Second week in May). This particular squid came from upper Buzzards Bay. Most interesting observation is that the tentacles lay flat. Like a hand laid on a table. I have better video of squid swimming too if anyone wants it, email me. This squid was about 12-14" long. The speed at which these critters move is remarkable. They are always bright red when startled or agitated, and as they calm they go back to white/translucent.

Internet says they are here most of the year, that they spawn in the spring and that's the flurry of squid activity. Their numbers thin out after that as the water warms. I always thought of them as nocturnal but most everything I read has them feeding all day and burrowing in sandy or muddy bottoms at night. Also read that Short fin squid are almost non existant in our waters (further south around NC and Florida) but Log Fin Squid make up the dominant population. Size range from small to 12-15" as adults.
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Last edited by ruge13; 05-16-2005 at 12:45 PM..
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  #40  
Old 05-16-2005, 12:50 PM
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Rock Gunnel

Boston Harbor is loaded with them. They are a colder water species. Usually in the 6-8" range but will grow to 14" or so. Bottom dwellers and slow swimmers. This one was caught by hand out on Faun Bar at low tide. Net says they are commonly found in tide pools but usually below the low tide line putting them in Bass water. Given the areas and numbers I've found them there is no doubt they are Bass food. They look and swim like eels. The net says they come in a variety of colors, but all the ones I have seen around here are redish brown. they have bright Red eyes. Usually well hidden, but there is no doubt a bass rooting in the cobble bars around here take plenty of them. Their range is from tide pools to the Banks and Arctic ocean to Cape Cod or so...

After a few days in the tank under various bottom types the colors change. At times it is a dark brown / red a with bright speckles fins. Other times it is almost khaki colored with washed out fin colors.

The eyes are always bright red. Maybe the one actual application for those red prism eyes from Orvis
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Last edited by ruge13; 05-23-2005 at 01:07 PM..
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  #41  
Old 05-19-2005, 08:45 PM
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Shaun, I just checked back here to see if you had added something new this spring, and, out of idle curiosity after seeing your rock gunnel pics, searched FishBase to see if they had anything on the rock gunnel. I have never observed or heard of one before your post. See <http://www.fishbase.org/ComNames/CommonNameSummary.cfm?autoctr=67381>

This is the first time I have ever run across a fish without a picture or detailed description on FishBase. Maybe you should send them your pics. They may be a first!
See <http://www.fishbase.org/home.htm> and click on "contributing pictures" on their home page. Hey, you might get your pics on an international fishy site. Whee!
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  #42  
Old 05-23-2005, 12:51 PM
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Shrimp??

I have no idea what kind of shrimp this is...I haven't ID'd it yet. There is a picture with a few next to sand Shrimp. They are very different, and different from the clear grass or ghost shrimp (unless they are 2 different things and I have one ovr the other).

Sand shrimp as mentioned above are found all over on sandy or muddy bottoms.
These other shrimp were found in a similar area. But, while Sand shrimp are nocturnal unless disturbed (like walking on them) these shrimp are active all day in bright light. They are free swimming and make no attempt to hide. They swim in the current and pick off food particles as they drift by, occaisionally chasing them down. They also occaisionally grab onto rocks and pick at them. They are both clear, and speckled. 1-2" long at most, and have long wiskers like a mouse equal to the body length.

When several of them were put in the new "baitfish gallery" they schooled up and hung together.

If anyone knows what they are, please let me know.
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  #43  
Old 05-23-2005, 12:55 PM
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And some more of everyone's flats favorite, the good old Sand Shrimp.

Having watched them for a while in a controlled environment, thier ability to change colors and camoflage is amazing. They are also nasty predators. They are ambush predators, laying under the sand with just the tip of the head and antenae exposed. They are lightning fast and have 2 extendable arms on the front of thier underside similar to a praying mantis or mantis shrimp. I watched one cut another shrimp larger than itself in half in the blink of an eye.
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  #44  
Old 10-12-2005, 02:54 PM
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where and how do you catch those atlantic macks on a fly? that looks like fun
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  #45  
Old 09-15-2006, 08:59 AM
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great pics, these'll help a lot
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