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  #1  
Old 07-06-2006, 04:22 PM
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what the hell bit me?

I was fishing on our dock at Spofford Lake NH over the weekend when a small bug - probably a little shorter than your average mosquito - took a chunk out of my finger. It was not a fly, it was dark with a rounded head and smooth wings, almost like a beetle shell, that tapered back to a point. It was flush to my skin, not up on legs like a skeeter or fly. I did not see any segmentation like a typical biting bug. It chomped just as I flicked it into the water. The resulting bite itched like a m.f. and developed a red pus-filled welt. Nasty. I have no clue what it was and never saw anything like it bite me before.

If you know of any suspects please post a photo.
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  #2  
Old 07-06-2006, 04:56 PM
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it's a black fly. no question about it.
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  #3  
Old 07-06-2006, 06:07 PM
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Have you ever had a run-in with a water boatman (hemiptera). It is decidedly larger than a black fly but fits the description of rounded head and beetle-like wing covers. They have a nasty sucking tube bite. I've only been bitten by them when they are grasped or pressed by clothing. If it was half the size of a mosquito, then it was probably a black fly (articus simulans). Google for pictures of each and I'd bet you will ID it. Hate those red weeping bites of black flies.
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  #4  
Old 07-06-2006, 06:16 PM
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Maine state bird, the blackfly.........
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  #5  
Old 07-06-2006, 06:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onshore
Maine state bird, the blackfly.........
a.k.a. one of the reasons I moved away from Maine. I always thought that Tim Sample was just kidding about blackflies until my first mud season in Maine. No matter how well you cover yourself, they can find any chink in your armor and tunnel in for a snack. The bites can last for weeks.
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  #6  
Old 07-06-2006, 06:45 PM
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Nope, a black fly it was not, those are love bites compared to what this little bastard gave me. Like I said it had almost a smooth appearance, not at all fly-like.

I looked up water boatmen - they apparently don't bite. Except for the "oars" though they look damn close to what got me.

Last edited by JSeamans; 07-06-2006 at 06:48 PM..
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  #7  
Old 07-06-2006, 07:18 PM
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Sounds like you got whacked by a backswimmer.
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  #8  
Old 07-06-2006, 07:23 PM
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Not trying to be pushy--but, would you try again on the hemiptera--try backswimmers--they look like the water boatmen but are very aggressive when contacted. If you have the book "nymphs" by the late Ernie Schwiebert, on page 116 he relates a run-in with these backswimmers where the trout were actively feeding on them and Schweibert's fishing buddy gets bitten by them. A quote from that page:" we seined a few specimens in the shallows, and there were hundreds enjoying the winter sun, hanging from the surface film with their heads and oarlike swimming legs extended. Sometimes they hung motionless for several minutes, exploding to life when some luckless organism came within range of their predatory beaks. Coffee plucked a live backswimmer from the seine with his fingers--Ouch, He gasped with pain. They bite!! The water bugs of the order hemiptera are all equipped with jointed sucking beaks of needlelike sharpness. --" I also have been bitten by them many times, but only when I have handled them or got them trapped under clothing. They sting like fire for a minute or two. On the bright side, it is rare to get bitten very often unless you are harassing them.--Not enough of a nuisance to cause you to stay inside, for sure.
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Old 07-06-2006, 07:41 PM
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Back Swimmers
(Notonectidae)
The Back Swimmer looks very similar to the Water Boatman with a few important differences. While the Water Boatman swims right side up, the Back Swimmer swims upside down. And where the Water Boatman eats mostly plants and debris the Back Swimmer is predacious.

The animal has a keeled back and paddle like legs, the hind legs , like those of the Water Boatman are longest. They come to the surface to rest and replenish their air supply by sticking the tip of their abdomen out of the water. They also hold air next to their bodies giving them a silvery look.

There are about 35 species of Back Swimmer, 20 in North America. Back Swimmers are vicious predators and eat animals much larger than themselves with their toxic saliva they can deliver a painful bite. Nymphs are similar to adults and molt into their wings.

The above taken from http://www.naturalaquariums.com/inverts/truebugs.html
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  #10  
Old 07-07-2006, 10:19 AM
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One day at lunchtime I was walking under a tree here in NJ and something flew at me. It went right down my t-shirt and into my bellybutton. I had to pry it out. It was round and beetle-like. Scared the %#@! outta me!
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  #11  
Old 07-07-2006, 10:51 AM
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My fishing buddy was trimming the rose bushes in front of his house last week, when a bug flew into his ear. He said he heard this huge buzzing inside his head and tried to get it out with his finger. It only drove the bug in further. He paniced and grabed a small twig to use to get the bug out. That drove it in even further.
His next door neighbor is a MD and his wife is a nurse. The nurse was at home and she tried using tweezers to get the ever buzzing bug out. Nothing worked. So, she called her husband the MD and my friend went to his offce. The MD flushed it with a syringe and on the third try the pieces of the bug came out.
My pal said- "Doc, did you get it all out?". Doc looked inside his ear again and said. "Yeah, except for the eggs"

Bob
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2006, 11:28 AM
frankhuey2000 frankhuey2000 is offline
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Man thats nasty whooof i hate bugs!
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  #13  
Old 07-07-2006, 11:53 AM
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by glassguy
My fishing buddy was trimming the rose bushes in front of his house last week, when a bug flew into his ear. He said he heard this huge buzzing inside his head and tried to get it out with his finger. It only drove the bug in further. He paniced and grabed a small twig to use to get the bug out. That drove it in even further.
His next door neighbor is a MD and his wife is a nurse. The nurse was at home and she tried using tweezers to get the ever buzzing bug out. Nothing worked. So, she called her husband the MD and my friend went to his offce. The MD flushed it with a syringe and on the third try the pieces of the bug came out.
My pal said- "Doc, did you get it all out?". Doc looked inside his ear again and said. "Yeah, except for the eggs"

Bob
Believe it or not, that same scenerio was the story line for a 1960 episode of the Twilight Zone. Except in the TV show, and earwig driiled it's way right through the man's brain, entering the left ear, exiting the right. The amazed physician said the man would make a full recovery, except for one thing...
The earwig was a female, and she layed her eggs deep within the man's brain.
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  #14  
Old 07-07-2006, 12:06 PM
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Well, I actually told my friend he just should have opened his mouth and let it fly out.

Bob
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  #15  
Old 07-07-2006, 03:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyFishMich
Back Swimmers
(Notonectidae)
The Back Swimmer looks very similar to the Water Boatman with a few important differences. While the Water Boatman swims right side up, the Back Swimmer swims upside down. And where the Water Boatman eats mostly plants and debris the Back Swimmer is predacious.

The animal has a keeled back and paddle like legs, the hind legs , like those of the Water Boatman are longest. They come to the surface to rest and replenish their air supply by sticking the tip of their abdomen out of the water. They also hold air next to their bodies giving them a silvery look.

There are about 35 species of Back Swimmer, 20 in North America. Back Swimmers are vicious predators and eat animals much larger than themselves with their toxic saliva they can deliver a painful bite. Nymphs are similar to adults and molt into their wings.

The above taken from http://www.naturalaquariums.com/inverts/truebugs.html
Here is a link to a picture in case anyone is interested...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Back_swimmer
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