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  #1  
Old 09-18-2006, 11:12 AM
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MatthewP MatthewP is offline
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Tuna 9/14 9/15/ 9/16 recap

Three day trip fishing from my brother's boat in cape cod bay and beyond. Myself, my brother Steve, and two buddies - Ryan and Jake on board. All accomplished anglers - Awesome team to fish with. Love those tuna when they're on ballyhoo. when they're feeding agressively on fast moving bait, just get it in front of them and they'll eat it.

Day one (I had to work, so it was a team of three). Four hits, one fish on board. all in the 40 to 45 lb class. L-Jacks and Hydro poppers were the flavor of the day. Two fish pulled out, and one was lost to tangled power pro. Last day of the reduced size limit, so one fish was kept. Cooked and eaten that night. Those of you who know... nothing like fresh tuna. Try this recipe. It's my favorite.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?t...ecipe&dbid=153

Day two: 7 hits, 5 fish over the gunnel. all released. same size 40 to 45 lb fish. One fish on a popper. Three on L-Jacks. One on the fly! Jake made the shot with the 14 wt - grey/white first light rabbit strip tuna pattern. In Jake's words "the fish turned on a dime to inhale it". The fight was on. Jake worked the fish quickly. 5 minutes into the up and down segment of the fight, things got interesting. I was on the bow trying for a double when I heard POW. I looked back to see Jake now fighting with 1/2 of a 14 wt. The other half was on it's way down the 600 grain line to join the fish. Who needs all 8' 6" anyway? Jake works the fish up with what he's got left. Lip gaff, photo, fish is released. Blown up rod is going back for some therapy.

Day three: Some good shots in the morning. One fish in the boat on an L-Jack. (Have I mentioned that this hard-to-get jig PRODUCES?). The fleet shows up and procedes to troll through pod after pod until the tuna decided they've had enough. No more shots after about 8 am. Long day after that with incredible wild life shows (whales, sunfish, porpoises). Here's a link to a cool video from that day (there's some profanity - 4 guys on a tuna trip - no surprise there, so watch the volume or view when it's appropriate)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8a--Ytmf-0

see photos for fish etc. great trip. hoping for a repeat this coming weekend.
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  #2  
Old 09-18-2006, 11:27 AM
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Ray Ray is offline
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Nice report, but aren't you pretty, too, close to that whale???
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  #3  
Old 09-18-2006, 11:58 AM
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MatthewP MatthewP is offline
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good question

I should've been clearer about the whale. We were drifting, engine off for a good long while (longer than I care to remember - waiting for the fish to come back up). This whale approached the boat - we didn't approach the whale - a few times. Each time the whale would surface within 50 ft or closer, blow some air, and then swim near/under the boat. I agree with your thought that whales should be given plenty of space, and left to their own devices. That's how we run the boat - around them. This circumstance was unique, and has never happened before. What's the protocol? Were we irresponsible by not firing up and motoring away? Seemed appropriate to let the whale decide how close was too close. At the end of the video, the whale kicks it into gear and swims away pretty quickly. Not sure what happened there, other than us crowding to that side of the boat to get a look.
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Old 09-18-2006, 12:10 PM
Mooncusser Mooncusser is offline
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Turn your fishfinder off and they will leave you alone.
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  #5  
Old 09-18-2006, 12:42 PM
JohnnyR JohnnyR is offline
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OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES WHEN IN SIGHT OF WHALES:

From two miles to one mile away:
Reduce speed to 13 knots. Post a dedicated lookout to assist the vessel operator in monitoring the location of all marine mammals. Avoid sudden changes in speed and direction. Aircraft observe the FAA minimum altitude of 1,000 feet over water.

From one mile to one-half mile away:
Reduce speed to 10 knots.

From one-half mile to 600 yards away:
Reduce speed to 7 knots.
Maneuver to avoid head-on approach.

Close approach procedure 600 feet or closer:
Parallel the course and speed of moving whales up to the designated speed limit within that distance.
Do not attempt a head-on approach to whales.
Approach and leave stationary whales at no more than idle or "no wake" speed, not to exceed 7 knots.
Do not intentionally drift down on whales.
Vessels in multi-vessel approaches should maintain communication with each other (via VHF channels 9, 13, or 16 for hailing) to coordinate viewing.
Take into account the presence of obstacles (vessels, structures, fishing gear, or the shoreline). All vessels in close approach must stay to the side or behind the whales so they do not box in the whales or cut off their path.

Stand-by Zone -- From 300 feet to 600 feet away:
Two vessel limit within the 300- to 600-foot Stand-by Zone at any one time.

Close Approach Zone -- From 100 feet to 300 feet away:
One vessel limit.
Other vessels stand off. (up to two vessels in the Stand-by Zone and others outside 600 feet).
If more than one vessel is within 600 feet, the vessel within 300 feet should limit its time to 15 minutes in close approach to whales.

No Intentional Approach within 100 feet.
Do not approach within 100 feet of whales. If whales approach within 100 feet of your vessel, put engines in neutral and do not re-engage propulsion until whales are observed clear of harm's way from your vessel.

Departure Procedure

All vessels should leave the whales following the same speed and distance procedures described above.

In order for vessels to be clear of whales before dark, vessels should cease whale watching and begin their return to port 15 minutes before sunset.

Penalties: A violation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act or the Endangered Species Act may result in fines or civil penalties of up to $10,000 or criminal penalties of up to $20,000 plus IMPRISONMENT and/or SEIZURE OF VESSEL and other personal property.

CONTACT NUMBERS

Whalewatching Information

For more information on the whalewatching guidelines or laws pertaining to marine mammals you should call:
National Marine Fisheries Service, Protected Resources Division -- 978-281-9254 OR
Gerry E. Studds/Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary --781-545-8026

Right Whale Sighting

All sightings of a right whale should be called in to the NMFS Sighting Advisory.
Sighting Advisory System -- 508-495-2264 or 978-585-8473 (Beeper)

Entangled Whale

Any sighting of an entangled whale should be reported. Vessels should stand-by and keep the whale in sight until help arrives, or arrange for another vessel to maintain contact with the whale.
Disentanglement HOTLINE -- 800-900-3622 or call the USCG on VHF CH-16

Dead Whale

Any sighting of a dead whale should be reported.
Marine Mammal Stranding Network -- 508-495-2090 or 978-585-7149 (Beeper)

Potential Violations

Any reports of an activity that appears to be an intentional or negligent action leading to a collision or harassment incident should be called in to the NOAA Enforcement Office. Enforcement HOTLINE -- 800-853-1964
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  #6  
Old 09-18-2006, 12:57 PM
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MatthewP MatthewP is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyR
No Intentional Approach within 100 feet.
Do not approach within 100 feet of whales. If whales approach within 100 feet of your vessel, put engines in neutral and do not re-engage propulsion until whales are observed clear of harm's way from your vessel.
It's not completely clear, as we were not under power at all, but it sounds like we were within guidelines? Thanks for this, JonnyR. Good information for everyone out targeting tuna.

Also, mooncusser, the sonar thing makes perfect sense.
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  #7  
Old 09-18-2006, 05:00 PM
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billfish billfish is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MatthewP
Also, mooncusser, the sonar thing makes perfect sense.
I've also heard to keep the engine running at all times so they are aware of your presence...
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